Editorial: Hasty decisions usually come with a price

One of the major mobile telephone operators was recently caught in the eye of the storm via social media.

One of the major mobile telephone operators was recently caught in the eye of the storm via social media.

A social media pundit took to his keyboard to vent his frustration as well as seeking monetary justice from the service provider.

The bone of contention was a 10 per cent surcharge on a certain operation and it did so without bothering to inform its customers or the regulator. It created a negative buzz on the internet that spread quickly and it was not long before Rwanda Utilities Regulatory Agency (RURA) got wind of it and promised to investigate.

The wheels were set into motion and quickly the service provider backtracked and apologised, once again highlighting the power and reach of social media.

But the question remains; why should organisations make unilateral decisions that have far reaching implications before first consulting stakeholders?

Just recently, the University of Rwanda (UR) announced a major shakeup in the institution. Among the major decisions was the relocation of some schools from one campus to another, closing some schools and creating new ones.

The idea behind the reforms could have been well intentioned to improve efficiency and remove bottlenecks. But why play the lone wolf? Why not consult with stakeholders in order to avoid future misunderstandings like the current one between UR and Higher Education Council (HEC)?

It definitely does not profit anyone by causing unnecessary friction; in fact, the reverse is true. Learning to do things by the book and taking other people’s interest into considerations should be a no-brainer.

 

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