Motoring corner: “Caring for Your Car’s Engine”

A car or motor vehicle for that matter is a very expensive and important asset to whoever owns one.  The cardinal function or reason for owning a car is the fact that, it must be there when you need it.  In other words, it must be in the best of working conditions at all times.
Frequent changes flush abrasive dirt and metal particles out of the engine
Frequent changes flush abrasive dirt and metal particles out of the engine

A car or motor vehicle for that matter is a very expensive and important asset to whoever owns one.  The cardinal function or reason for owning a car is the fact that, it must be there when you need it.  In other words, it must be in the best of working conditions at all times.

Owning a motor vehicle and keeping it in that trim condition are two different things.  Many car owners get it all wrong on the first day and that would make you hate the vehicle for ever, get it right and you will love the vehicle!

The most important item to watch on your vehicle is the “Engine Oil”; this is the “blood” of the vehicle.  Change Oil Frequently; any good driver knows that frequent oil changes is the key to keeping your car on the road year after year.

And while owner’s manuals for today’s cars recommend increasing long intervals between oil changes, the fact remains, frequent changes flush abrasive dirt and metal particles out of the engine, prolonging its life.

Most owners’ manuals recommend a more frequent interval for “severe conditions.” To maximize the life of your engine, follow the severe intervals recommendations, especially if you drive regularly in stop-and-go traffic (urban)!

Never take your oil level for granted, always check the engine oil level by using the engine deep stick and if the oil has reduced, top up.  Check Engine Oil at least once a week.

For an accurate reading, follow this procedure; run or drive your car for about 15 minutes to warm the oil; then park the car in a level place. Turn off the engine and wait 15 minutes to allow the oil in the engine to drain back to the oil pan; then remove the dipstick and wipe it clean with a paper towel or rag.

Reinsert the dipstick, being sure to push it in all the way, and then pull it out again to check the oil level. It should be somewhere between the hash marks on the dipstick; if low, add the type and amount of oil as specified in your owner’s manual, if necessary.

Always avoid over-filling your crankcase with oil. Don’t overfill your engine crankcase with oil. If you do, the oil can rise into the crankshaft, where air bubbles will get churned into the oil.

Your oil pump can’t do a good job of circulating oil with air bubbles. The result can be overheating and stress on engine components.

Overfilling can also contaminate your spark-plugs. In fact, overfilling is a bad idea with all automotive fluids.  

Use the oil viscosity grade that’s recommended in your owner’s manual for the temperature range you expect for the coming season.

Lighter grades (lower viscosity, such as SAE 5W-30), often specified for today’s smaller car engines, will deliver easier starts and better engine protection in winter and improved fuel mileage throughout the year, thanks to less internal engine friction.

Do not use a heavy grade of oil in cold winter climate or you will risk damage to your engine.  Lastly, know what oil works with your vehicle, Turbo Engines use special oils; some automatic engines are particular on what oil you use.
 
motoringcorner@live.co.uk

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