Artistes speak out on Liberation songs

Most Rwandans consider 4th July as the most important day in the country. Artistes sing about the day because it is a significant turning point in the country’s history and music was a channel through which the message of Liberation was passed. Songs from artistes like Eric Senderi and Sgt Robert Kabera of the Army Jazz Band are popularly aired.  Society Magazine had a one-on-one with some Rwandan artistes who commented on the significance of Liberation Songs.
L-R :Kitoko Bibarwa ;KING JAMES;MISS JOJO
L-R :Kitoko Bibarwa ;KING JAMES;MISS JOJO

Most Rwandans consider 4th July as the most important day in the country. Artistes sing about the day because it is a significant turning point in the country’s history and music was a channel through which the message of Liberation was passed. Songs from artistes like Eric Senderi and Sgt Robert Kabera of the Army Jazz Band are popularly aired.

Society Magazine had a one-on-one with some Rwandan artistes who commented on the significance of Liberation Songs.

Kitoko Bibarwa sung the popular songs, “Ikiragi” and “Agacecuru” and explains that Rwanda’s youth get the constructive messages from music.
“Musicians influence youths when they combine their message with the rhythm. Youths could be bored through watching other inspiring TV programmes, but quickly learn from songs.” KITOKO.

This R&B artiste wishes to see more people write songs about liberation.

“The number of songs on liberation is still small, yet they are the most important, especially for the people we entertain.” KING JAMES.

The dancehall queen admires patriotic songs.
“I envy our artistes who have invested time into writing and recording nationalistic tracks – they have done a great service indeed. However, I would greatly discourage anyone from singing about liberation for recognition or personal gains—a good artist sings from the heart.” MISS JOJO

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