Surviving as a House Broker

Acquiring the right house in Kigali’s suburbs is not a walk over, especially in a good residential area. Thankfully house brokers become life savers in such trying times.
Theogene Civiringa, waits for a client. He does most of his work on phone. (Photo / G. Mugoya)
Theogene Civiringa, waits for a client. He does most of his work on phone. (Photo / G. Mugoya)

Acquiring the right house in Kigali’s suburbs is not a walk over, especially in a good residential area. Thankfully house brokers become life savers in such trying times.

Due to the ever growing competiveness and high demand for houses in Kigali, landlords and tenants have sought a common ground and confided in house brokers.

Theogene Civiringa, 28 years, lives in Remera and is one house broker who loves his job.

Operating around Kisementi, Civiringa has been working as a private broker for over five years.

 “Success as a house broker requires openness so that people know exactly what you do. Landlords as well as clients will trust you if you remain in good working terms with the two parties,” he said.

Any time is working time for Civiringa, provided there are clients.

“My work has no specific time to start but involves making several appointments with people whom I’ve never met. I still don’t know how they get my contacts,”

Although he describes his job as dangerous, he says it’s the only successful career he has encountered.

He explains that just like any other businesses, becoming a renowned house broker has taken him such a long time to earn big.

“I am not complaining even though I don’t have a fixed salary,” Civiringa said.  

“It’s only tricky in a sense that when business is high, I earn as much as Rwf1million to Rwf500,000 a month. But when the worst comes to the worst, I earn less than Rwf200, 000,” he added.

Civiringa said the terms of payment are two ways—landlords and clients have to pay their commission once the job is done.

“My terms are, 50 percent of the monthly rent of a house from both parties since I work for both of them,” he said.

“As a broker, I have to create a wide network especially around city centers. This helps me to coordinate with other brokers who may have clients, but can’t find vacant houses.”

His greatest tools are his two legs and a mobile phone—a gadget that simplifies his work.

“I receive several calls in a day and I can’t even think of how much I spend on making calls,” he said.

That however, is not an issue for Civiringa because, “Air time and transport expenses are the prime capital in our business.”

Civiringa says that he enjoys his work, and also believes in achieving his dream.

“I must aim higher by saving from what I earn so that I can start a wholesale shop besides being a house broker,” he said.

mugoyag@yahoo.com

ADVERTISEMENT