Campaign style and fashion

We are at that time where cars are encased by flags and posters while people are proudly wearing T-shirts and hats that feature the abbreviation of the party they like, YES I’m talking about the presidential campaigns! The elections are just around the corner and we can feel it.
The gown
The gown

We are at that time where cars are encased by flags and posters while people are proudly wearing T-shirts and hats that feature the abbreviation of the party they like, YES I’m talking about the presidential campaigns! The elections are just around the corner and we can feel it.

This is a time for people to express support for their preferred party, and what better way to do this than with badges, flags, T- shirts, and so on?

Advertising through party themed gadgets is an important part of the campaigning procedure because these items play a key role in attracting the public.

According to Innocent Ndayisaba, who is among the numerous campaign stall keepers in Kigali, it is important for parties to sell these items because it is an effective way for them to create awareness and market themselves.

“It is important to sell these items so that people can buy them and support their parties,” he said.

Ndayisaba sells a variety of items that range in cost, from different coloured T-shirts to all clocks, badges and pens.

“Every day we get high sales because people like these sorts of things very much,” he said. He went on to add that the most popular items at his stall are the badges, which are affordable and portable.

The election campaigns have also opened up many doors of opportunity for businesses that saw this as a thriving chance to make good money.

Whether on the streets and shop windows, or on people and cars, we see evidence of their handy work everywhere we look that have greatly contributed towards making this election period a vibrant and celebrated one.

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