Cultural Gala opens Lisa’s eyes

“Mum, I would be so much delighted to be aunt carol’s maid if only it wasn’t for this useless Mushanana,”Lisa said. Few weeks ago, Lisa stood up her over expectant auntie just because Lisa couldn’t stand wearing the mushanana which is Rwanda’s cultural wear.

“Mum, I would be so much delighted to be aunt carol’s maid if only it wasn’t for this useless Mushanana,”Lisa said.

Few weeks ago, Lisa stood up her over expectant auntie just because Lisa couldn’t stand wearing the mushanana which is Rwanda’s cultural wear.

Lisa dubbed cultural trends err, non-trendy and boring. She would get a basket full of laughter whenever she saw people carrying the locally made fiber handbags or jewelry.

As for the rest of the kids who spoke lots of Kinyarwanda, Lisa would rebuke saying its “local vernacular” that should never be tolerated.

Oe day a cultural gala was annoucnced at her school and Lisa without a second thought decided to boycott it.

However, her endevours ended up empty when Lisa’s mother forced her to go for the gala.

“I will just sit in the class and watch weird people enjoying,” she sulked.  Lisa went against her word to rebel when she saw the variety of students and the perfect decoration.

The gala was featuring culture from Uganda, Rwanda and Kenya. Three beautiful girls carrying flags for their respect countries were standing before each exhibition.

“I am Pearl, and you,” asked a little girl, carrying the Ugandan flag.

Lisa sheepishly introduced herself, she was struck by the way girls her age were elegantly dressed  in traditional wear.

They loved their culture and she did not. Pearl explained to Lisa that she was named after Uganda, ‘The Pearl of Africa.’

“It’s usually referred to as the pearl of Africa,” she explained.

Moving around, Lisa saw very beautiful hats, with Rwanda written against them. Among the items representing Rwanda, were the peace baskets, local jewelry and African wear.Suddenly, Lisa started admiring them!

Little girls and boys   were dancing Rwanda’s “amaraba” cultural dance. Lisa knew nothing of the sort! She regretted having spent her life forging an American accent.

The truth of the matter was that Lisa was Rwandan and her culture was the best in the world.

“I will always carry my country’s flag and respect my cultural values,” Lisa told Charity, her friend.

Since then, Lisa is always eager to know Rwanda’s history and the rich culture of her country.

Ends

Subscribe to The New Times E-Paper


You want to chat directly with us? Send us a message on WhatsApp at +250 788 310 999    

 

Follow The New Times on Google News