Masamba’s Visa to Fame

Little kids are known for being uncertain of their future professions as they grow into adults. Many parents will display thousands of options before their children but making a choice still stands a big problem.

Little kids are known for being uncertain of their future professions as they grow into adults. Many parents will display thousands of options before their children but making a choice still stands a big problem.

With Intore Masamba, Rwanda’s famous musician, the story is completely different. Masamba’s struggle to fame started at a very early stage. He clearly knew that someday, he would be the biggest music star Rwanda has ever had.

“At 7, I started my music career .More than anything, I wanted to advocate for culture,” explains Masamba.
Masamba adored his father, Athanase Sentore, who was then a famous cultural artist.

Though the family was residing in Burundi as Rwandan refugees, Masamba’s father, through music determinedly promoted the Rwandan culture.

“I cherished the Rwandan cultural music, thanks to my dad for supporting and being my greatest inspiration,” states Masamba.

According to the Super Star, life as a refugee was never simple but cultural music reminded them of home. Masamba recalls many Rwandans turning up for his dad’s live concerts.

Because finances were scarce, Rwandans would happily walk long distances to the show, with entrance fee alone.

All Masamba kept dreaming of was that day when the entire Rwandan crowd in Burundi would trek, just to watch him sing. Not long, with the help of his dad, Masamba made his first composition.

“It was a love song dubbed ‘Nduwawe’. “This song propelled  me to fame,” says Masamba.

Apart from, singing in the church choir and performing in a dancing cultural troop, Masamba started performing Nduwawe on stage.

He performed alongside, his father, Sentore and the then famous musician, Florida Uwera.

Being the second born, among 9 children, Masamba got all the support a family could ever give. His brothers and sisters were music fanatics and would never let him quit.

With all the challenges, Masamba never considered quitting as an option. He had to make it; for his late father and family.

When he clocked 20, Masamba took cultural music to a higher level.

“I upgraded my music with modern instruments. I opted for the guitars and Pianos instead of the harp and flute,” says Masamba.

After upgrading it, his music became international and darling to many.

Masamba is famous for traditional songs, proclaiming the beauty of the Rwandan culture. Songs like ‘arihehe and nzaginama nande’ portray the Rwandan ancient ritual and cultural practices.

According to Masamba, it’s only cultural music that can redeem Rwanda and restore the values of culture. Though he sings about love, Masamba declares himself a cultural artist.

“I will always make Rwandans aware of the beautiful history of our ancestors. A Rwanda with no genocide and no divisions,” explains Masamba.

Masamba has advocated for the Rwandan culture abroad. He recalls exploring Ugandan villages educating Rwandan refugees why they should consider coming home {Rwanda}.

Masamba also made Rwanda famous in Brussels, while attending school ;he attained a diploma in Music Dance and Drama.

At 40 now, Masamba has dedicated his next album to God and his fans, as a way of giving back to the community that never stops backing him.

The artist’s next album is composed of eight gospel songs. After that, he will concentrate on advocating for women and child rights.

“The advocacy project will be a way to give back to my community. I will not only donate funds, I will give my heart,”Masamba says.

As he gives back to the community,Masamba’s aim is to leave a legacy.

“I want to be recorded in Rwandan history, as someone who strived to restore culture. I want the next generation to read about me,” states the Music icon.

lillianean@yahoo.com

Subscribe to The New Times E-Paper


You want to chat directly with us? Send us a message on WhatsApp at +250 788 310 999    

 

Follow The New Times on Google News