Drinking water for the elderly

As people grow older, the balance between the need for water and thirst takes a shift. The less water an older person drinks, the less thirsty they become, creating a risk of serious dehydration and other complications.

As people grow older, the balance between the need for water and thirst takes a shift. The less water an older person drinks, the less thirsty they become, creating a risk of serious dehydration and other complications.

At the very minimum, one should consume one cup of water for every 20 pounds of body weight daily, that’s around 6-8 glasses for the average person.

Exercise and warm weather both call for additional water intake to replace fluids lost through excessive perspiration.

So, all those elderly citizens need to increase water intake.

Increased fiber intake among elders, which is usually recommended for older people to aid with constipation and other health concerns, also increases the need for water.

The human body is at least 50% water, of which 2-3 quarters is lost on a daily basis. Even bones are over 20% water, and apart from replenishing what is lost in order to hydrate the blood and tissues, water also lubricates joints, regulates temperature, and moistens the lungs to allow for breathing.

Inadequate water can lead to arthritis, sore muscles, heavy breathing, and a higher body temperature.

Not drinking enough water over time can result in more severe effects at an older age, which should be the golden years.

Elder people are at particular risk for dehydration because their kidney function diminishes.

Symptoms of dehydration include confusion, drowsiness, labored speech, dry mouth, and sunken eyeballs.  Over time, lack of water can lead to even organ failure.

In order to maintain your health state, the kidneys must excrete a minimum of ten ounces of waste per day. When water is not available, there is nothing present in which to dissolve the body’s waste products such as uric acid and urea for expulsion.

As a result, they build up within the body leading to kidney stones, while putting additional strain on the kidneys to find adequate liquid with which to expel toxins.

To maintain good health, the average intake of water for an elderly should be at least two and a half liters of pure water each and every day.

Remember the quality of your drinking water is just as important as the quantity.

Ends

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