Car matters: Understanding that automatic car

Last week’s series on understanding that automatic car continues. However, for those who did not have a chance of reading one, the series emphasised the engine power of transmission when choosing between an automatic and a manual car. It was proven that a manual engine transmission would be the best bet over the automatic.

Last week’s series on understanding that automatic car continues. However, for those who did not have a chance of reading one, the series emphasised the engine power of transmission when choosing between an automatic and a manual car.

It was proven that a manual engine transmission would be the best bet over the automatic. It’s because automatic transmission only allow the engine to operate in its narrow range of speeds that can’t be manipulated. Remember, its transmission shifts automatically into higher gears as the car begins to move forward faster.

In line with speed and engine power, this series will consider the acceleration of transmissions that allow the engine to operate.

The acceleration offered from a vehicle when equipped with a manual transmission is usually superior for a number of reasons.

This is predominantly due to gear ratios and the availability for more precise shifting from one speed level to another. With an automatic, the driver basically steers and controls the acceleration with its fixed gears.

The reverse is with the manual where acceleration is controlled by change of gears after engaging the clutch. To explain, if you own a car that receives 200 horsepower at 7,000 revolutions per minute (RPM), but your automatic transmission will up-shift under full throttle at only 6,000 RPM, you probably will never feel the full amount of power that your engine was made to offer.

A horsepower refers to the engine performance rate of the car. So, your engine may be stamped with a 200 horsepower rating, but because your car is equipped with an automatic that up-shifts too soon, you may be missing up to 20 percent of available power, unlike the manual that enables you to get the most power possible to the front, rear, or all 4 wheels under full throttle take-offs.

Watch out for next week’s series that will highlight the fuel consumption rate for both cars.

Contact: eddiemukaaya@yahoo.com