Fashion / Style: Dress for the commemoration period

As we commemorate 16 years after 1994 Genocide against Tutsi, the Sunday fashion page reminds us to hang-back all hot clothes and switch to simple clothing or mourning colours.
L-R: Stay stylish, Purple is forever flattering.
L-R: Stay stylish, Purple is forever flattering.

As we commemorate 16 years after 1994 Genocide against Tutsi, the Sunday fashion page reminds us to hang-back all hot clothes and switch to simple clothing or mourning colours.

You might ask yourself what our outside appearance has to do with what we are feeling inside.

Well, first of all, our outside appearance does matter a lot, whether we like it or not. It is not just about the beauty on the surface, but beauty with a cause. It is also about how you present yourself to the public.

Your physical appearance can either earn you recognition from the public or ruin everything, regardless the occasion.

Now that we remember our loved ones, who perished in the Genocide, we ought to be conscious about our looks and styles.

Throughout 100 days of the commemoration period, which are sad times to all Rwandans, we need to embrace colours like, purple, which is the official mourning colour in Rwanda.

However, some people have different choices concerning the colours to wear, while mourning for their loved ones.

Alex Munezero, 29, a survivor of the genocide says he prefers to wear black. He adds that he bought several black shirts in different designs to wear throughout the commemoration period.
“Black is a colour that symbolises sorrow and agony,” Munezero said. 

 “That’s why people wear black on burial ceremonies.” Munezero says that he also has a set of different red shirts which he normally wears during the commemoration period and on other mourning moments.

The commemoration is held across the country and many parts of the world. However, as far as fashion and beauty are concerned, the commemoration period will not be an excuse for anyone to hit offices and streets looking untidy.

Remember to visit beauty saloons regularly and stay fashionable. After attending dozens of vigils and all commemoration activities, how can we not visit the saloon.

There are plenty of purple and black outfits in local fashion shops, and the streets of Kigali. Looking smart is one way of showing our lost ones that what the genocidaires planned never succeeded and Never Again will it happen.

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