Bahá’í

If you believe that the universe, in some form is on the side of justice, then you have something in common with Ali-Muhammad of Shiraz, Iran who proclaimed that he was “the Bab” (which literally means “The Gate”). This monotheistic religion, was founded by Bahá’u’lláh in the 19th century in Persia. The followers of this new religion though persecuted, like when in 1978 and 1998, 200 were executed, persisted and are up to now more active as ever. It is said to have six million followers worldwide and seventeen thousand in Rwanda.

If you believe that the universe, in some form is on the side of justice, then you have something in common with Ali-Muhammad of Shiraz, Iran who proclaimed that he was “the Bab” (which literally means “The Gate”).

This monotheistic religion, was founded by Bahá’u’lláh in the 19th century in Persia. The followers of this new religion though persecuted, like when in 1978 and 1998, 200 were executed, persisted and are up to now more active as ever. It is said to have six million followers worldwide and seventeen thousand in Rwanda.

This religion came to Rwanda in 1963 and has been active ever since. Among its followers in Rwanda, two are currently at the National University of Rwanda.

However “small” this religion is, it has a very particular and a quite convincing teaching on different aspects of life.
First and foremost, it emphasizes on the spirit of unity of all humankind.

In Bahá’u’lláh’s faith, humanity is understood to be in process of collective evolution, and the need of the present time is for the gradual establishment of peace, justice and unity on a global scale.

Bahá’i teachings and doctrines are very simple. They are based on three principal cores: the unity of God, the unity of Religion and the Unity of humankind.

Bahá’is do accept the validity of most of the world’s religions, whose founders and central figures include Jesus, Mohammed, Buddha, etc.

God is often referred to by titles and attributes such as the All powerful or the All loving. These attributes are not just for praising the Almighty but are also to help humanity change character and confirm it to that of the creator.

Bahá’i substantially emphasises on monotheism, and however the respect that Bahá’i followers have for other religions, doctrines such as the trinity contradict the Bahá’i view that God is one and has no equal.

According to Bahá’i teachings, the human purpose is to learn, to know and love God through such methods as prayer and reflection.

In Bahá’i belief, God reveals himself through people, such as Bahá’u’lláh, Mohammed and Jesus. This process of progressive revelation will not end, but is believed to be cyclical.

The next manifestation is not believed to happen before more than thousand years after Bahá’u’lláh.

Bahá’i do believe in after life. Life after death according to their writings is purely spiritual. When a human being dies, the soul passes into the next world, where its spiritual development in the physical world becomes a basis of judgment and advancement in the spiritual world.

Heaven and Hell are thought to be spiritual states of nearness or distance from God. This describes relationship in this world and the next. According to Bahá’i, Heaven and Hell are not physical places of reward and punishment achieved after death.

Bahá’i have a large volume of writings, the Kitáb-i-Aqdas ( the most holy book) and the Kitáb-i-Íqán (The Book of Certitude). These writings are recognized as major theological works.

These writings are emphasizing the essential equality of human beings and abolition of any sort of prejudice. Humanity is seen as essentially one, though highly varied; its diversity of rare and culture are seen as worthy of appreciation and acceptance.

Bahá’i encourage intercultural marriages and have a very simple but meaningful marriage ceremony where the bride and the groom have to speak out in front of two witnesses the following vows: “ We will all, verily, abide by the will of God”.

Contact: muvunyiv@yahoo.co.uk

ADVERTISEMENT

 

Have Your SayLeave a comment