Africa doesn’t have to choose between China and America

Editor, Reference is made to your article, “US-Africa summit: How East Africa will benefit” (Sunday Times, August 10). 
Africa should work with both China and the US to build competitiveness. File.
Africa should work with both China and the US to build competitiveness. File.

Editor,

Reference is made to your article, “US-Africa summit: How East Africa will benefit” (Sunday Times, August 10). I found this a great and fair analysis of the Chinese and American investment and interest in Africa. Indeed as Benjamin Gasamagera, the Chairman of the Private Sector Federation, says we don’t have to choose between the two but rather work with both and ensure that Africa’s interests are guarded in both cases.

The main thing we have to watch out with the Chinese is the quality of their products and services and to limit the number of Chinese workers as job creation is a priority for us.

I think the 2,500 Chinese who will work on the East African Community’s railway project is still high. However, as you rightly pointed out, Africa stands to benefit from trading with both the Chinese and the Americans and this should also impact aid by reducing our dependency on it.

Gerald, Rwanda

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The Scramble for African cake (resources) will be a struggle where every bottle should sit on its bottom and be firm in order to avoid every wind that blows back and forth.

Africa generally, and Rwanda specifically, should have a strong base to sit on because they have a home advantage...those who come to us should dance to the music tune they find us playing.

Isn’t it such that when you go to Rome you behave as the Romans do?

Mwene Kanyangira, United Kingdom

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This is definitely a great read.

During the last week, I have read comments congratulating The New Times on its new substance; well, this is more my type of articles, analysis of global issues putting them in perspective and showing their importance to our region and your writer here has done just that and not in a boring way.

I love the figures of speech in the article; America, as a returning ex lover with renewed interest, is the best way indeed to explain this new phenomenon.

Once again, I thank The New Times for a good Sunday article.

Norbert, Rwanda

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