Why Rwanda ranks high in statistical capacity

Rwanda is among top three  countries in Africa with outstanding statistical capacity, says the World Bank. The country scored an overall 77 points out of 100, according to the World Bank’s statistical capacity indicator 2012.
Enumerators duirng a past exercise. The government has put in place statistical strategy that has helped to build statistical assistance in all sectors across the country.   The New Ti....
Enumerators duirng a past exercise. The government has put in place statistical strategy that has helped to build statistical assistance in all sectors across the country. The New Ti....

Rwanda is among top three  countries in Africa with outstanding statistical capacity, says the World Bank.

The country scored an overall 77 points out of 100, according to the World Bank’s statistical capacity indicator 2012.

The survey, released last week, assessed the statistical capacity of 140 developing economies across the globe.

Egypt tops the list with 87 points followed by Mauritius (83) in overall indicators.

The indicator analyses the countries’ capacity to provide reliable and periodical data regarding different aspects of socio-economic development.

The statistical framework consists of three assessments that include methodology, data sources and periodicity and timeliness.

Rwanda scored 60 points in methodology, 80 in data sources and 90 in periodicity and timelines. In the East African Community bloc, Uganda follows with 70 points, then Tanzania (69), Kenya (58) and Burundi (54).

Speaking to The New Times on Friday, Yusuf Murangwa, the director general of the National Institute of Statistics of Rwanda (NISR) said that his institution has managed to produce periodic and timely statistics regarding the country’s development.

“The methods and the quality of the data sources we use are among the indicators that have enabled Rwanda to achieve that position in Africa,” he said.

Five pillars

Murangwa added: “The reason we improved is that in the last three years the government has put in place statistical strategy that runs through  early 2014. The strategy has helped  provide statistical assistance across the board.”

He noted that the statistical strategy has five pillars which include data production, dissemination and services used in statistics, capacity building, coordination of statistical capacities and appropriate resource mobilisation. “Most of these pillars have been achieved thanks to the support rendered by NISR staff and the government.”

The NISR head explained that when statistical capacity improves, the government’s planning processes are streamlined for better planning of the citizens.

“We regularly publish economic statistics and there are so many opportunities and it is through this the business community gets information to be able to make informed decisions.”

In 2009, NISR developed a five-year national strategy on statistics; it includes improved surveys delivery and more professional management as evidenced by integrated Household Living Conditions Survey (EICV), national census, quarterly and annual GDPs.

Statistical methodology measures a country’s ability to adhere to internationally recommended standards and methods. This aspect is captured by assessing guidelines and procedures used to compile macroeconomic statistics, and social data reporting and estimation practices.

Source data reflects whether a country conducts data collection activities in line with internationally recommended periodicity or data from administrative systems are available and reliable for statistical estimation purposes.

According to the survey, periodicity and timeliness dwells on the availability and periodicity of key socioeconomic indicators, of which nine are Millennium Development Goals indicators.

It measures the extent to which data is made accessible to users through transformation of source data into timely statistical outputs.

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