Selective justice is a threat to international law

Editor, This is a world of selfish interests and has no mercy at all. How can the US put pressure to arrest Congolese rebel leader, Bosco Ntaganda, yet provide a safe haven to the perpetrators of the 1994 Genocide? against the Tutsi?

Editor,

This is a world of selfish interests and has no mercy at all. How can the US put pressure to arrest Congolese rebel leader, Bosco Ntaganda, yet provide a safe haven to the perpetrators of the 1994 Genocide? against the Tutsi?

Genocide is the worst ever crime to human nature. But some countries and the United Nations are hesitant to use their efforts to arrest genocidaires like Felicien Kabuga and others living in Europe and the Americas and bring them to justice or even send them to Rwanda where they committed the crime.

But they pull all the stops to ensure Bosco Ntaganda owns himself up.

How we wish they can do the same to the Genocidaires?

Mite, Kigali


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DRC’s General Bosco Ntaganda’s pending extradition to the International Criminal Court in The Hague, The Netherlands, by the US, is very complicated and it might set a precedent in the International Law.

The US is not a signatory to the Rome statute, which established the ICC. The law allows states not party to the court to cooperate only the following three basis; (1) By an ad hoc arrangement,

(2) by an agreement between US and ICC or  (3) by any other appropriate basis which is not clearly defined by the law.

Therefore, Ntaganda’s extradition to ICC by the USA might alter the International Law. Let us wait and see what will happen.

John Sesonga, Kigali

Reactions to the story, “Ntaganda leaves US in a check”, (The New Times, March 20)

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