Indeed, a savings culture is the solution

Editor, Allow me to add my voice to an article by Diana Mpyisi, “Rwandan weddings and a savings culture”, published in The New Times on Tuesday. This was a very relevant article indeed.

Editor,

Allow me to add my voice to an article by Diana Mpyisi, “Rwandan weddings and a savings culture”, published in The New Times on Tuesday. This was a very relevant article indeed.

Diana, I debated with my ex-wife for months and then weeks before our wedding date on that issue of expensive wedding. And at the end of the day, I did not enjoy my wedding day and that kind of attitude continued to haunt us in our married life until it was impossible to bear!

Ndugu Uwumugisha
Chicago, IL

Editor,

Thank you Diana for this great piece. People who intend to marry will learn from it. We must really change our lifestyles; we must all get tired of this ‘donor’ syndrome. On a positive note, however, I notice that soft drinks are becoming the norm instead of alcohol at wedding receptions. That’s great, even as some people don’t serve beer because of religious beliefs.

Your concerns and advice should be heeded and addressed by all including the officials in charge of culture, youth and religious affairs.

Why should burden people? If you don’t have the money, you should have a small wedding instead of borrowing money, which you will not be able to pay back after the wedding.

Joe
Kigali

Editor,

If all the partners and couples could take Diana’s advice, then they would save their relatives and friends from emptying their pockets to a 24-hr project. Thanks Diana for the opinion. Marrying does not mean buying expensive clothes, drives, or showing off.

Well, people who come to your wedding will be happy if they are served well but after the wedding, nobody will be there to shoulder your burden.

Vim
Remera

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