Medics receive advanced trauma skills

Over 20 doctors and 15 nurses across the country yesterday completed a three-day course in Advanced Trauma Life Support at King Faisal Hospital. A group of five doctors from the American College of Surgeons and one from South Africa conducted the training. The Chairman of the Rwanda Surgical Society, Dr. Emmanuel Kayibanda, said the training is very essential for medical practitioners dealing with patients that have especially had severe injuries.
U.S. trauma surgeon Susan Briggs during a training session with doctors at King Faisal yesterday. The New Times /Timothy Kisambira
U.S. trauma surgeon Susan Briggs during a training session with doctors at King Faisal yesterday. The New Times /Timothy Kisambira

Over 20 doctors and 15 nurses across the country yesterday completed a three-day course in Advanced Trauma Life Support at King Faisal Hospital.

A group of five doctors from the American College of Surgeons and one from South Africa conducted the training.

The Chairman of the Rwanda Surgical Society, Dr. Emmanuel Kayibanda, said the training is very essential for medical practitioners dealing with patients that have especially had severe injuries.

“This training provides a methodical and brief training for the early care of trauma patients that is very effective. The medics will now improve their knowledge and skills in treating and handling injured patients like those that have been involved in accidents or fallen from heights,” Kayibanda noted.

He stated that Rwanda is the second country in Africa, after South Africa, to benefit from the training. He added that those that have benefited will in turn be able to train other medics within and outside the country.

One of the trainers, Susan M.Briggs, observed that the training has equipped the medics with skills and knowledge to handle head, chest trauma and life saving interventions among many others.

“It’s an international course in trauma that we believe is very important for all doctors to have so they can also train others. They will learn to care for injured patients much better and also save lives,” Briggs added.

A surgeon at King Faisal Hospital, Albert Nzayisenga, who was among the beneficiaries, stated that the training was very educative.

“It’s the first time we have this international training. I have learnt how to give priority to life threatening conditions and the most severed patients whose lives can be saved,” Nzayisenga said.

He concluded that they have had almost similar trainings but the recent one was exceptional, very professional and most definitely going to make a positive difference in the way they would handle injured patients.

Ends

Subscribe to The New Times E-Paper


You want to chat directly with us? Send us a message on WhatsApp at +250 788 310 999    

 

Follow The New Times on Google News