Scooper Knight shoots videos

US-based Rwandan artiste Scooper Knight, who arrived in the country a few weeks ago, is shooting two videos “Lady”, the cover of his latest album and “I feel for you”, a song dedicated to homeless children.Speaking to The New Times, the star said that his songs are based on the circumstances he experienced and what people go through. The songs deliver a positive message of hope to the hopeless.
Scooper Knight. The New Times Courtesy photo. /The New Times  photo
Scooper Knight. The New Times Courtesy photo. /The New Times photo

US-based Rwandan artiste Scooper Knight, who arrived in the country a few weeks ago, is shooting two videos “Lady”, the cover of his latest album and “I feel for you”, a song dedicated to homeless children.

Speaking to The New Times, the star said that his songs are based on the circumstances he experienced and what people go through. The songs deliver a positive message of hope to the hopeless.

Scooper encouraged parents and guardians to provide education to their children and participate in the fight against poverty in the country.

“Education is a key to success and parents have the responsibility to educate their children for a better future,” he said.

The four songs on the EP feature on Scooper's latest album dubbed “Lady” already available as downloads.

Scooper’s music is unique, inspirational, compelling, soothe and full of life. And the combination of his British and American accent gives listeners his life’s traits.

His album will also encompass two of his Kinyarwanda hits; the remix of “Muteteri”, the song that introduced him to fame and “Oya ntumbeshye” – Don't lie to me, which refutes negative comments people spread overseas about Rwanda.

“As an artiste and someone who loves my country, I have to use my talent to disprove the negative claims people spread overseas. I want the world to know that Rwanda is now a safe, beautiful, and orderly country,” Scooper stated.

“The Rwandan government has really done a tremendous job in terms of rebuilding country after the 1994 genocide against the Tutsi. So, if I went back to the U.S and kept quiet, I would be a hypocrite,” he added.

Apart from promoting his music in the country, Scooper said that he would support orphans and establish business activities in the country.

“I want to contribute to the development of my country – Rwanda,” Scooper concluded.  

After proving to be the youngest talented artiste in Rwanda in the 1990s, with the most requested song “Muteteri” on the radios, and after sharing the music stage with artistes, such as Chaka Chaka, who felt like Scooper's musical talent was too big for the national level. She then invited him to South Africa.

At 17, Scooper left Rwanda for South Africa to pursue his music career at the international level. And in 2001, he went to the U.S, where he continued his career and studies. Scooper is now an American citizen. 

Ends