Japanese scholar commends Rwanda’s governance

A Japanese political scientist, Dr Sadaharu Kataoka, believes that Rwanda has continued to be exemplary in displaying good leadership and governance on the African continent.Kataoka is the president of the Japan–based Waseda Institute of International Strategy, International relations and African studies.
L-R; ULK Rector Dr. Ezechiel Sekibibi, Japanese Ambassador to Rwanda Kunio Hatanaka and Japanese political scientist, Dr Sadaharu Kataoka pose for a group photo The New Times /Courtesy
L-R; ULK Rector Dr. Ezechiel Sekibibi, Japanese Ambassador to Rwanda Kunio Hatanaka and Japanese political scientist, Dr Sadaharu Kataoka pose for a group photo The New Times /Courtesy

A Japanese political scientist, Dr Sadaharu Kataoka, believes that Rwanda has continued to be exemplary in displaying good leadership and governance on the African continent.

Kataoka is the president of the Japan–based Waseda Institute of International Strategy, International relations and African studies.

He is in the country as part of an African tour where he is visiting various  countries and giving lectures on conflict management and Japan’s role in Africa.

In an exclusive interview with The New Times after addressing students of Kigali Independent University (ULK), the scholar acknowledged critical institutions such as the Office of the Ombudsman which have helped fight corruption and other forms of injustices.

He added that all these are symbols of good leadership and governance.

“This country has good leadership and governance. It’s more democratic compared to other regional countries,” he said.

He commended the government for preparing the recent presidential elections which he said were free and fair.

The political expert noted that for Africa to be politically stable, there was need to establish good governance, rule of law, free and fair elections as well as using political dialogue in conflict resolution.

The Japanese Ambassador to Rwanda, Kunio Hatanaka, hailed the existing relationship between two governments, saying it would continue to improve since both countries have become like brothers, especially in helping one another.

“Our government and the Japanese people expressed gratitude towards Rwanda for helping us during the recent disasters. Rwanda was the first country to declare its condolence to Japan. All these show that the relationship between two countries exists and will continue,” he said.

Theogene Maniriho, a second year student in international relations at ULK, commended the scholar’s lecture, saying that the students had something to learn from such international experts.

“I have learnt much from Dr Kataoka’s lecture, especially regarding conflict resolution in Africa. He taught us several things and I think as students, we need to have such experts to expand on our understanding especially, in international issues,” said.

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