Why would some countries protect Genocide fugitives?

Editor, It is really saddening that some countries are still unwilling to apprehend Genocide suspects living on their territories, even after the Government and the International criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) produced enough evidence implicating these suspects in the 1994 Genocide against Tutsi.

Editor,

It is really saddening that some countries are still unwilling to apprehend Genocide suspects living on their territories, even after the Government and the International criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) produced enough evidence implicating these suspects in the 1994 Genocide against Tutsi.

I was shocked when news filtered through that the Chief Prosecutor of the ICTR, Hassan Bubacar Jallow, had complained to the UN Security Council, last week, that the tribunal encountered difficulties while tracking Protais Mpiranya, a top Genocide fugitive believed to be hiding in Zimbabwe.

African countries share similar problems and it would be ironic to protect criminals, who will devour the children of the host countries the next day.

Though some countries have cooperated in arresting suspects and handed them over to the tribunal, others have continued to frustrate Rwanda and ICTR by doing the exact opposite.

I, therefore, appeal to all countries to cooperate and apprehend all remaining fugitives by arresting these suspects and transfering them to Rwanda or ICTR they will have contributed towards ending the culture of impunity inthe whole world.

There is no reason why countries like Zimbabwe should refuse to seize Mpiranya, who was the commander of the notorious Presidential Guard during the Genocide.  Let us give our full support to the ICTR.

Ruth Mukasine
Nyamata