Media code of conduct nears completion

Local journalists yesterday met to revise the provisional “Code of Conduct” and come up with a final version. The document will help journalists in their self-regulation following the decision by the government to leave practitioners to regulate themselves.
Jean Bosco Rushingabigwi, one of those involved in preparing a code of conduct for journalists
Jean Bosco Rushingabigwi, one of those involved in preparing a code of conduct for journalists

Local journalists yesterday met to revise the provisional “Code of Conduct” and come up with a final version.

The document will help journalists in their self-regulation following the decision by the government to leave practitioners to regulate themselves.

It comprises of 26 articles which outline the rights and responsibilities of media practitioners on how to get news without compromising the law and the treatment that they expect from their sources and employers.

The code of conduct does not deviate from international or national laws which govern the press.

“It does not mean that a journalist who doesn’t abide by this document will be punished; it will only equip them with guiding principles to serve the society better, and operate within the confines of the law,” said Jean Bosco Rushingabigwi, one of those who prepared the paper.

Hassan Sabiti, a practitioner, welcomed the validation process, saying it gave an equal voice to all stakeholders.
“After verifying these articles, the outcome will be accepted by every journalist, since they had an equal chance of contributing to the document,” he said.

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