The risk of not delegating work

Whether they know it or not, bosses who do not delegate responsibilities risk delay getting their work done as well as that of the entity. They also inadvertently stall the otherwise timely attainment of an entity’s objectives. Such bosses are sometimes also cause of departures of some very useful employees.

Whether they know it or not, bosses who do not delegate responsibilities risk delay getting their work done as well as that of the entity. They also inadvertently stall the otherwise timely attainment of an entity’s objectives. Such bosses are sometimes also cause of departures of some very useful employees.

One of the reasons they do not delegate is because they do not trust their juniors. This is because they too are not trustworthy. So they think everyone else is like them. By so doing, they in turn also risk not being trusted by their juniors.

They also unnecessarily frustrate their juniors’ loyalty and total commitment to work. Worst of all, they spoil the main purpose of delegation, which is meeting work deadlines. They also delay other people’s work in the department or entity whose process of doing their work requires the bosses’ input or go ahead.

Clients and customers are also in this way forced to wait unnecessarily for their bosses’ input. In the case of businesses, sales are delayed thus impacting negatively on the company’s overall income and profits. Time conscious customers also stop coming back. This hence impacts negatively on the entire goodwill of the business.

The secondary purpose of delegation is to give juniors an opportunity to learn new responsibilities, so that they can properly act in their positions whenever they are not available for a given period of time. 

It is also common knowledge that when a boss does not delegate they bring unnecessary stress upon themselves because they have too much work to do within a short period of time.

Delegation Tips

The purpose of delegation is to meet work deadlines. It is an exercise that involves sharing and distributing work responsibilities.

However, if a junior wants to share part of their work with a boss to meet work deadlines, it is referred to as negotiation and not delegation.

Whenever you delegate, ensure that you do so early, at the very beginning of realizing that the work you are about to do is too much to finish alone within the required time. Avoid doing so late as it ends up becoming an abdication.
Once you decide to delegate, identify the right person with the right skills for the job. Sit down them down and brief them on what they are supposed to do. Without proper briefing, they it is not delegation. 

You should then give the delegate your mobile phone number so that they can contact you incase an issue may arise in your absence. Alternatively, inform them of your whereabouts and movement and your availability for consultation.

When physically available for consultation, keep watch at a distance and sometimes closely at the work being done. It’s important to avoid embarrassing colleagues by unnecessarily hovering over their heads or shoulders.

In case you spot anything wrong in their work, politely correct them. In case they are at the front of other people, call them aside or to your office and show them the correct way to do things. Avoid correcting them in a manner that makes them feel out of place.

You must remember that although they are your subordinates, the work they are doing is yours—not theirs. Put in mind that they are simply doing you a favour. It is therefore not proper or fair to harass them. 

Negotiation is done in a similar manner to delegation but with due respect since it involves your equals or seniors.

dalemuta@yahoo.co.uk 

 

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