Kwibuka23: Rotarians commemorate

Members of the rotary family of Rwanda, yesterday, paid a visit to the Kigali Genocide Memorial in Gisozi to commemorate as well as honour the victims of the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi.
Rotarians lay a wreath at Kigali Genocide Memorial  yesterday. Nadege I
Rotarians lay a wreath at Kigali Genocide Memorial yesterday. Nadege I

Members of the rotary family of Rwanda, yesterday, paid a visit to the Kigali Genocide Memorial in Gisozi to commemorate as well as honour the victims of the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi.

The group of over sixty Rotarians from the eight rotary clubs across the country held a Walk to Remember, toured the memorial as well as laid wreaths on the graves of the victims.

 

Speaking on behalf of the clubs, Paul Masterjerb Birungi, the Assistant Governor of district 9150 of the rotary family, condemned the acts committed during the 1994 Genocide as acts of “no love” and “betrayal against fellow man,”

 

“People who follow what happened in this country and other countries know that such things were done by people who have no love. Acts of genocide are acts of betrayal against fellow man, they are acts of no love and humanity,” he said.

 

“We support everything that humanity supports, so rotary objectives seek to help the community to make sure that we progress with others. So, coming to visit here is in support to anybody who is fighting against divisionism, anybody fighting against injustice, anybody fighting against inhumane activities. So, we are here to commemorate and join all other forces that are fighting genocide,” he added.

1497050271Rotarians-from-across-the-country-during-the-walk-to-remember-of-1994-Genocide-victims
Rotarians from across the country during the walk to remember of 1994 Genocide victims. Nadege I

Sonia Igiraneza, a senior four student from Kagarama High School, was one of the Rotarians that visited the Genocide memorial. She said the visit helped her learn more about the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi,

“There were some details I did not know, for example I did not know the trauma that followed the genocide. I have learnt it from here. I have learnt that in any situation, I have to stand for my nation and be its new hands as I work hard and avoid divisionism in order to develop my country,” she said.

For Emmanuel Emmanuel Kasumba, a senior five student from King David Academy, the visit left “a demand at heart.”

“It is really going to leave a demand at heart for me to exploit whichever thing I have learnt here. Our elders are concerned and brought us here to show us what happened in 1994 Genocide.”

editorial@newtimes.co.rw

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