Begging etiquette

Everyone loves to help the next man or woman or human for that matter in need, or so I would want to think. It’s the reason people give out money and the reason they lend.

Everyone loves to help the next man or woman or human for that matter in need, or so I would want to think. It’s the reason people give out money and the reason they lend.

But just because there are good folks out there willing to help does not mean you should beg and stampede and jostle people into the giving.

Simply ask! There’s a thin line between the two.

Just because you need a monetary bailout does not mean you now start or end your plea with such lines as; “You just got paid” and “the Lord will reward you abundantly” and “you don’t have responsibilities/a wife/children”!

If you think someone does not have responsibilities, then leave them alone and don’t run to them for a financial bailout. Let them stay that way –without responsibilities.

Also, leave out the talk of “God will reward you abundantly”, and not that I really have any issues with God or His ability to reward me abundantly. The point is that decent people do not give or do good because of the prospect of a reward. Decent people give for giving’s sake and they also do good for good’s own sake.

In my opinion, to do good in anticipation of heavenly reward would be to attempt to bribe God, and bribery is all wrong and it is immoral.

Also, if someone tells you they’re broke, believe them and don’t insist. If anything, who do you think you are, that you can get broke while others can’t? Be fair, be real and be kind.

When in need of money to borrow, don’t tell me about that cheque of yours that is almost due to cash. Instead of cheques, simply tell me the date you will pay me back.

Gone are the days when the mention of “cheque” would cause an earth tremor.

When asking or begging for money, it’s of utmost importance that you don’t make the potential lender look a fool or feel guilty in any way. There is nothing to be ashamed about not being able (or even willing) to extend you that “small loan”.

If it is a co-worker or professional colleague from who you expect a bailout, desist from such shallow and selfish utterances as “you earn more than me”. Since when did earning more than YOU become justification for giving YOU?

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