[VIDEO]: Uwamahoro sets World Cricket batting record

Rwandan cricketer Cathia Uwamahoro yesterday set a new world record for the longest time spent batting in the net. The 23-year-old, who started batting on Friday morning spent 26 hours batting.
Uwamahoro in action before breaking the 26 hour long record of batting in the net. (Photos by Sam Ngendahimana)
Uwamahoro in action before breaking the 26 hour long record of batting in the net. (Photos by Sam Ngendahimana)

Rwandan cricketer Cathia Uwamahoro yesterday set a new world record for the longest time spent batting in the net. The 23-year-old, who started batting on Friday morning spent 26 hours batting.

 

VIDEO: Uwamahoro sets new Guinness World Record. Source: KigaliToday/YouTube

 

Bowlers who included England women national cricket team Captain Heather Knight, National cricket captain Eric Dusingizimana and other cricket federation officials bowled Uwamahoro on her way to victory.

 

In an interview with Times Sport, a weary Uwamahoro  revealed that she was inspired to take part in the record breaking exercise in a bid to raise funds for the construction of a first ever home for cricket in the country as well as developing women cricket in Rwanda.

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Uwamahoro bows down to celebrate after the clock ticked to 26 hours.

Although the Rwanda Cricket association has played a significant role towards the growth of the game in the country, the number of girls in this game is still low which according to her may be due to lack of adequate knowledge and visibility of the game in the country.

“I appreciate everyone who has been around since yesterday (Friday) to witness history being made in Rwanda, all bowlers, the cricket society, my family, Journalists, friends and well-wishers for being there and supporting me. I was inspired to do this in order to raise money to build a good cricket ground with top level facilities and promoting women cricket in the country,” the 23-year-old said.

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Uwamahoro smiles after setting the new record.

After her historic feat, UAE Exchange Country Director Rayaz Naghoor promised to support her throughout her cricket career and also get her a job. UAE Exchange sponsor the national cricket league.

“Uwamahoro has become one of the 9000 employees of UAE Exchange and money transfer who are working in 32 countries around the world,” he said adding that she has worked hard to get here and therefore must be supported.

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Cricketer Uwamahoro poses with Eric Dusingizimana after setting the Guinness World Record.

Uwamahoro becomes the second Rwandan cricket player to set a world record in batting after her compatriot Eric Dusingizimana who holds a 51-hour  record of batting in the net he set in May, last year.

Who is Uwamahoro?

Uwamahoro is one of the most experienced women cricketers in the country, she has played cricket since the age of 14. she currently plays for Charity cricket club.

She was among the pioneer women cricket players, and it was not long before she was called to join the first national U-19 team that went on to compete in several ICC Africa U-19 Women Championships.

She has won 9 titles with Charity since 2013 which include; UAE Exchange (2013), V.R. Naidu T20, UAE Exchange, Blue Belly and Computer Point (2014), RCA T10, V.R. Naidu T20, UAE Exchange and Computer Point (2015) and this year’s V.R. Naidu T20.

Her personal achievements include; VR Naidu T20 player of the match awards five times, 2015 RCA expatriate most sixes, best batter and best fielder, RCA T10 MVP.

She has represented the country in many international competitions and has been voted as Charity CC best player of the year for the past three seasons.

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Uwamahoro captured in the net batting.
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Uwamahoro being congratulated by her mum and Ministry of Sports and Culture Director of Sports Emmanuel Bugingo
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Uwamahoro swammed by fans after setting the new record.

editorial@newtimes.co.rw

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