LETTERS: Why France is desperate to distort history of Genocide against Tutsi

They have no alternative to continuing to flog this same by now smelly putrid carcass of a 'case' as the alternative - if they are really interested in publicly identifying and charging those responsible for bringing that plane down - is to begin to look within their own camp.
Interahamwe militia train as a French soldier looks on in 1994. / Net photo
Interahamwe militia train as a French soldier looks on in 1994. / Net photo

Editor,

RE: “It could be worse: Rwanda vs France Part II” (The New Times, October 12).

 

They have no alternative to continuing to flog this same by now smelly putrid carcass of a 'case' as the alternative — if they are really interested in publicly identifying and charging those responsible for bringing that plane down — is to begin to look within their own camp.

 

Note I say 'publicly identifying', for I have no doubt they know who did it, or at least they have a good idea of the authors, but their so-called national security will not allow them to point fingers at those within their own establishment who made the fatal decision to bring down President Juvenal Habyarimana's aircraft, and with it their own nationals crewing the aircraft, as the necessary spark to the Genocide against the Tutsi.

 

To let their public see that their political and military elites are capable of this level of psychopathy in order to achieve foreign policy objectives (which we at the receiving end know just too well) is just a no-go area. It would bring down the Fifth Republic crashing down all around them and propel Marine Le Pen into the Elysee.

Thus expect that this case will never be closed and they will turn around and around trying to resurrect a dead horse of a case no matter how dead it is shown to have been from the very beginning. The sign of Cain on their foreheads can't be washed off. And to ensure nobody gives them a closer look and so to hide it, they will keep on encouraging people to look at the RPA instead, no matter how threadbare that theory has become. They have no alternative.

Mwene Kalinda

The issue of French interests in Africa is so entrenched that as much as 40 per cent of French GDP is derived from looting, pillaging, and raping of African resources especially in "French West African countries".

These Africans who are “more French than French" have been assimilated so much so that they can hardly survive without France. But in this age one wonders why anyone should be a handbag to France, and French interests that are neither sustainable nor beneficial to African interests.

And so by taking on Rwanda and Rwandan leadership, they can be sure they will fail in the same way they failed in their support for Habyarimana and his murderous regime. By losing Rwanda, they lost Françafrique. There is no turning back.

As for Nyamwasa, what else does one expect him to do under his conditions? Any reasonable judge would have to take into account that this is a hostile witness whose hearsay ‘evidence’ can’t supersede investigated evidence on the ground.  

This new accusation will have to be re-investigated on the ground, otherwise it remains subjective and highly biased claim. France must accept that their assimilation policy is not sustainable and leave Africans to lead themselves instead of enslaving them in the 21 century, which is bizarre for France and Africans who accept such enslavement.

Manasseh Nshuti

Why does Rwanda continue to respond to France's accusations and baseless innuendos, when they are nothing but traps to engage us in an endless debate to cover up their complicity in the Genocide against Tutsi?

We are an independent and sovereign State and should not jump whenever France says jump. We are giving them ammunition that they do not have, and are actually helping them cover up their participation in the Genocide. Or is this an attempt to sideline us come 2017?

I smell a rat. But I am also tired of French arrogance and patronising attitude.

Willis Shalita

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