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Let's use technology to combat Genocide ideology - Minister Nsengimana

The Minister for Youth and Technology, Jean-Philbert Nsengimana, has said that Rwanda has better technology to fight Genocide ideologies that are put forward by genocide deniers. The minister said this at the launch of Tigo Rwanda’s ‘100 days of love’ on Friday evening.
ICT Minister Jean-Philbert Nsengimana has called on Rwandans to use technology to fight Genocide ideology. (Courtesy)
ICT Minister Jean-Philbert Nsengimana has called on Rwandans to use technology to fight Genocide ideology. (Courtesy)

The Minister for Youth and Technology, Jean-Philbert Nsengimana, has said that Rwanda has better technology to fight Genocide ideologies that are put forward by genocide deniers. The minister said this at the launch of Tigo Rwanda’s ‘100 days of love’ on Friday evening. 

They were part of events to commemorate the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi.

 

“We have an obligation to focus on identity, opportunity and responsibility. Our identity defines who we are as people. We are Rwandans above everything else. Secondly, our government has given us opportunities that we never thought we would have, let’s not take them for granted and lastly, we have a responsibility to sustain the opportunities and continue making a better country for future generations,” he said. 

 

Nsegimana also said that the need to use technology to fight against Genocide ideology is crucial. He pointed out that Rwandan dissidents and Genocide deniers are always using the internet to continue hurting people by promoting the Genocide ideology. 

 

“We are better than them, more than them and if we all stand together, we can defeat them. Let’s use the technology we have to fight genocide ideology and I believe, as a person who lost friends during the Genocide, we can defeat them, he added.

The event that was hosted at the Tigo Rwanda headquarters was also graced by the Executive Secretary of Muhima Sector, John Ruzima and the Tigo Rwanda CEO, Tongai Maramba.

In his address to the gathering that included survivors of the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi, John Ruzima asked everyone to take the time to remember the events of 1994.

“In 1994, Rwanda was seen as a failed state. But today, everything has changed due to the policy of unity and reconciliation. Whereas the pre-1994 government spread nepotism, sectarianism and hate, today the Rwandan leadership has changed all that. The former failed state is developing in every way. Let us remember the Genocide while building ourselves and our country”, Ruzima said.

Muramba said that it was an honour for Tigo Rwanda to be part of the commemoration and that to them it was more about touching the hearts of Rwandans, helping them and comforting them through this period. He also added Tigo Rwanda will be doing “100 of Love” by giving back to communities and commemorating with them. 

“We have an initiative to help communities across the country. From different departments, groups will discuss and decide what they what to do in these 100 days. As management, we have already contributed Rwf 2M which we used to put up solar panels at Bisesero Memorial for lighting. We shall not stop here, we will always be part of Rwandans as they commemorate,” he said. 

John Ruzima, Muhima Sector Executive Secretary asked everyone to take the time to remember the events of 1994.

“In 1994, Rwanda was seen as a failed state. But today, everything has changed due to the policy of unity and reconciliation. Whereas the pre-1994 government spread nepotism, sectarianism and hate, today the Rwandan leadership has changed all that. The former failed state is developing in every way. Let us remember the Genocide while building ourselves and our country”, Ruzima said.

After Minister Nsengimana’s address, a movie titled ‘Kinyarwanda’ was screened as part of the vigil. It’s a movie that shows the compassionate side of some people during the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi.

At the time when the Genocide against the Tutsi happened, the Mufti, according the movie, issued a fatwa (ruling on a point of law given by a recognized authority) forbidding Muslims from participating in the killings against the Tutsi. From this act of benevolence, he saved several lives.

The movie, which has been screened several times in the past, reflects on how members of the Muslim community shunned taking part in the massacres with many of them sheltering those who were being hunted.

editorial@newtimes.co.rw 

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