[EDITORIAL] The will to confront genocidal forces has more than increased

As Rwandans entered into the second week of mourning their loved ones who perished during the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi, a not surprising event occurred in the northern parts of the country.

As Rwandans entered into the second week of mourning their loved ones who perished during the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi, a not surprising event occurred in the northern parts of the country.

A group of armed men made an incursion from the Democratic Republic of Congo and attacked a police post before they were repulsed.

 

One may tend to believe it is the usual insurgency that that has marred that region for the past two decades, but that is far from the truth. The timing and the authors were not just simple coincidences, it has great significance.

 

The attackers who call themselves the Democratic Forces for the Liberation of Rwanda (FDLR) are nothing more than an offshoot of the defeated former Rwandan Army (ex FAR) and the Interahamwe militia who spearheaded the Genocide.

 

By staging attacks they know well that it will amount to nothing, they are sending a message; they intend to finish what they started in 1994. It is also another form of mocking the survivors and disturbing their wounds.

These repeated attacks are also testimony that the FDLR still have some backers or sympathizers; either among DRC officials or members of the UN peacekeeping mission, MONUSCO.

Otherwise, how does one explain the ease by which they come and go at will? By the way, what happened to their much touted disarmament?

The UN and other organizations should stop being a farce and take up their responsibilities, but that, it seems is in short supply. How come they have not even come out openly to denounce the unwanted provocations?

But those throwing stones from the safety of our neighbours compound, should keep one thing in mind: the will and determination that stopped the Genocide, if anything else, has multiplied tenth fold and sometimes patience runs out.

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