We must protect the truth about the 1994 Genocide against Tutsi

Editor, RE: “Genocide studies key to the fight against hate speech in schools” (The New Times, April 13).
The youth take part in the Walk to Remember on Saturday. (Village Urugwiro)
The youth take part in the Walk to Remember on Saturday. (Village Urugwiro)

Editor,

RE:Genocide studies key to the fight against hate speech in schools” (The New Times, April 13).

 

I am often saddened by the fact that we, Rwandans, are also vague when it comes to the facts concerning our history. For instance, the phrase “close to one million people were killed during the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi” in this article is not appropriate. It also gives a wrong connotation, because “close to” always implies less than the figure, but we all know that for our victims the figure is above a million not less.

 

The concrete figures of our victims are well known and our young generations have the right know it, and the rest of the world to be made to quote the same in all their publications and speeches in the long run.

 

Secondly, in the UN circles they always like to say that there was a Rwandan genocide for Tutsi and moderate Hutu, and this is grossly wrong too.

Although there were many Hutu that were against the genocide ideology against the Tutsi, the Genocide was not targeting to exterminate Hutu or Twa. Genocide targets only a section of a population and any generalisation makes it to be less of a genocide.

Our media should make it their responsibility to educate the world about our situation and history. Anything that is expressed in general terms loses its meaning.

Donart

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