[PHOTOS]: Local institutions to write about Genocide

All institutions that operated in Rwanda during the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi have been encouraged to conduct research on the Genocide and document it so as to help fight genocide ideology, denial and revisionism.
A Rwanda Revenue Authority staffer poses a question during the commemoration event at Kimihurura. (S. Muvunyi)
A Rwanda Revenue Authority staffer poses a question during the commemoration event at Kimihurura. (S. Muvunyi)

All institutions that operated in Rwanda during the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi have been encouraged to conduct research on the Genocide and document it so as to help fight genocide ideology, denial and revisionism.

This was announced during a joint commemoration event organised by Rwanda Revenue Authority, the National Electoral Commission, and the Office of the Auditor General at their headquarters at Kimihurura, Kigali.

 
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Prof. Kalisa Mbanda (2ndL) and other officials during the discussion.

The three institutions hold a joint commemoration event every year.

 

Jean louis Ndahigwa, the principal legal advisor at the National Commission for the Fight Against Genocide (CNLG), said every institution will compile its own history of what happened in it during the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi, to not only preserve the memory of the Genocide, but also counter its denial.

 

“Under the guidance of CNLG, every institution will gather information and write about the Genocide from its own experience. This will facilitate memory and provide facts about the Genocide”.

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Gayawira gives testimony during the commemoration event at Kimihurura

Prof. Kalisa Mbanda, the chairperson of the National Electoral Commission, told pmourners how divisionism was initiated by colonialists and nurtured by post-independence regimes that sowed hatred, discrimination and genocide ideology among Rwandans.

He called upon everyone to engage in the fight genocide ideology so as to build a new country.

“Rwandans have one language, culture and history. Thus, we should not allow anyone to separate us since what unites us is more important than any differences,” he noted.

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Participants follow during the commemoration event at Kimihurura.

Pelagie Uwera, a commissioner at the National Electoral Commission, reiterated the need to know the country’s history through reading and writing.

“Let’s write our history lest we forget. We should read so as to know our history and teach others, especially our children,” she said.

The commemoration event included songs, testimonies, and discussions about genocide ideology.

Patrick Gayawira, a survivor, gave a testimony of how he survived the Genocide after a narrow escape from Interahamwe militia. He lost his father who was killed at Commune Rouge, a notorious place in Gisenyi where thousands of Tutsi were slaughtered in the Genocide.

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Participants follow during the commemoration event at Kimihurura. (S. Muvunyi)

Gayawira has since recovered from the horrible past and now works for Rwanda Revenue Authority.

During the discussion, participants stressed the need to uproot genocide ideology with a special focus on young people.

Musician Mariya Yohana performed different songs that helped sooth and instill hope in survivors.

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