Do we have a Plan B for Icelandic volcanoes?

EDITOR, Reading The Times UK newspaper yesterday the headline “Scientists forecast decades of ash clouds” got me thinking. According to scientists, the Icelandic eruption that have caused so much misery for air travellers could be part of a surge in volcanic activity that will affect the whole of Europe for decades.
Iceland could be at the start of a surge in volcanic activity that may produce more eruptions.
Iceland could be at the start of a surge in volcanic activity that may produce more eruptions.

EDITOR,

Reading The Times UK newspaper yesterday the headline “Scientists forecast decades of ash clouds” got me thinking. According to scientists, the Icelandic eruption that have caused so much misery for air travellers could be part of a surge in volcanic activity that will affect the whole of Europe for decades.

These scientists have reconstructed a timeline of 205 eruptions in Iceland, spanning the past 1,100 years, and found that they occur in regular cycles — with the relatively quiet phase that dominated the past five decades now coming to an end. Some volcanologist’s believe that at least three other big Icelandic volcanoes are building towards an eruption.

Now if these estimates are correct, I think that it’s only wise that we think about finding ways around this issue.

Just last month our exports to Europe and tourist traffic into Rwanda were affected because flight-routes were closed and aircraft grounded. Well, we weren’t prepared for that eventuality and so our muted reaction was justified.

However, if scientists are telling us that we should expect more ash clouds over Europe, my question is “what are the politicians and technocrats doing about this; how shall they react to the next ash cloud”?

I certainly hope that there is an international Plan B being discussed. Pretending that everything will go back to normal is just irresponsible.

Alline Abera
Remera

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