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Schools get instructional materials

The Education Development Centre (EDC) has distributed school instructional materials to at least 2,478 public and government aided primary schools countrywide to advance quality of education and facilitate the implementation of the new competence -based curriculum.
EDC-L3 trained teachers on appropriate use of new materials.  (Frederic Byumvuhore)
EDC-L3 trained teachers on appropriate use of new materials. (Frederic Byumvuhore)

The Education Development Centre (EDC) has distributed school instructional materials to at least 2,478 public and government aided primary schools countrywide to advance quality of education and facilitate the implementation of the new competence -based curriculum.

The materials distributed last week, include 1,818 SD Cards, 1,818 phones and 1,818 speakers.

 

The learning and teaching materials were developed by the Literacy, Language and learning (L3) initiative in partnership with Rwanda Education Board (REB) and the University of Rwanda’s College of Education to strengthen teaching and learning in the country.

 

L3 initiative’s activities are implemented by Education Development Centre (EDC) and funded by the United States Agency for the International Development.

 

Distributed materials include read aloud story collections, speakers and phones, solar panels, teacher’s guides and pupil’s book and Kinyarwanda, Maths and English books for only Primary 1 and Primary 4.

Protogene Ndahayo, the programmes implementation coordinator at EDC-L3in Rwanda, said the project is playing a crucial role in the development of national standards for reading and mathematics for the primary grades.

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Head teachers receive school materials.

“The students would finish Primary 3 with little reading and writing skills. L3 was implemented to solve that problem of poor reading and writing skills. We focused on distributing learning and teaching materials to help teachers and pupils,” said Ndahayo.

“In 2015, we conducted a survey following the 2014 baseline and we have seen changes. The number of children who would have difficulties in reading is significantly decreasing. We have encountered a decrease of the number of students who would drop out due to insufficient materials and poor guidance.”

He added that school materials would enhance effective teaching and child-centered learning.

According to EDC, the materials will play a crucial role in improving children learning capacity.

This would be through allowing learners to learn new language in a meaningful context and generate interest in reading.

The audio programmes would guide teachers and students through effective, interactive lessons using songs, games, chants and poems, facilitating schools to use technology and developing children’s literacy and numeracy skills among others.

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Education stakeholders follow the meeting yesterday. (Photos by Frederic Byumvuhore)

Benjamin Ndayambaje, the in charge of nursery, primary schools and illiterate elderly people in Gakenke District, said the use of L3 materials has improved teachers and pupils English language proficiency.

“Songs, games and audio lessons have increased pupils’ interest in learning. L3 distributes books that help children access them easily. Children would be discouraged by inadequate school materials. Since L3 began, pupils have full access to the distributed books and take them home for self reading and analysis. School children love to read and parents involve in improving literacy by encouraging them to read,” Ndayambaje said.

Claude Ayabashi, the Education officer in Muhanga District, said L3 initiative decreased students’ dropout rate in Muhanga and improved students’ learning.

“Our partnership is built on advancing the quality of education focusing on learning and teaching under learner centered method.L3 materials are used to achieve such. Audio lessons help learners and teachers improve the level of listening and speaking skills.

Children enjoy audio lessons. Students are now participating in their learning unlike before,” Ayabashi said.

Jeremie Uwamahoro, the head teacher at GS Bwenda in Gakenke District, said children have access to quality reading materials which creates critical thinking and problem solving skills necessary for real life situations.

At least 2954 education stakeholders including district education officers, sector education officers and head teachers from public and government aided schools countrywide have been trained on school materials management and appropriate use under the same programme.

The Literacy, Language and learning, a six year initiative since 2011 to 2017, aim to strengthen teaching and learning so that pupils leave primary schools with solid literacy and numeracy competences.

editorial@newtimes.co.rw

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