Letter of the week

Reference to the story In the footsteps of Ndabaga, the legendary trailblazer, published January 29, 2015 Editor, It was great reading the story of a young girl, Ndabaga, one of the few renowned brave women in Rwanda’s recorded history. Most young girls barely know about such heroines and I doubt if such figures are taught in our secondary schools.

Reference to the story In the footsteps of Ndabaga, the legendary trailblazer, published January 29, 2015

Editor,

It was great reading the story of a young girl, Ndabaga, one of the few renowned brave women in Rwanda’s recorded history. Most young girls barely know about such heroines and I doubt if such figures are taught in our secondary schools.

Although the story was built around Ndabaga, our girls don’t have to go to such measures to be heroines in our society. There are many things that can be done which could equal to being a heroine.

A hero or heroine is a person admired for their courage, outstanding achievements, or noble qualities. We have seen excellent women who have touched lives or sacrificed their life for a good cause.

Take for example Faith Uwantege, who at 23, quit her job at Sabyinyo Silverback Lodge and decided to start Faith Foundation that helps orphans, widows and the most vulnerable families in Kinigi Sector, Musaze District. Her services have transformed lives in the area. To many people, she is their heroine and it’s what she does in her day-to-day life that has transformed lives. Isabelle Kamariza’s Solid Africa has eased life for patients stuck in hospitals, another heroine.

Anne Heyman’s Agahozo Shalom Youth Village is changing societies. All these people have set excellent examples for young girls and all they needed was courage and passion, which anyone can have.

Mable K, Kacyiru

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