When English sounds so foreign!

We all know English is a problem to many French speaking people but some are taking it too far.  A professor (who graduated with a PHD from a university in the USA) isn’t supposed to hustle with English as much. The saying, you can take a villager to town but you can’t take the village out of them, defines this scenario properly.

We all know English is a problem to many French speaking people but some are taking it too far.  A professor (who graduated with a PHD from a university in the USA) isn’t supposed to hustle with English as much. The saying, you can take a villager to town but you can’t take the village out of them, defines this scenario properly.

This guy practically lectures in Kinyarwanda; you can now imagine how he mentions circuits and transistors in Kinyarwanda. Too hard!

So one day the Dean is walking around and the man tries his best to speak English. I don’t know what was worse, his English or Kinyarwanda because I never understood a single thing. He seemed rather uneasy.

His body excreted so much sweat that you would think this man was competing with Bolt in a race. The one thing that really made me feel sorry for him was his new shirt covered with patches of sweat around his armpits. Almost the size of his head!

He made one very big grammatical mistake and I couldn’t keep it anymore. I burst into laughter - the whole class was waiting for that one person to laugh so that they can too. We all laughed but he still singled me out.

He called me out and took me straight to the Dean. These were his exact words, “Dean, this boy very bad for a long time. You have to expel him. Either me or him have to go.”

Karma at its best – it was my time to sweat. I tried to negotiate my way out but the man wouldn’t hear of it. His English got worse the more I begged.

When the Dean uttered one Kinyarwanda word, the lecturer poured out his heart like a tap that has just been opened.  He talked of how I always come to class late and I never listen. I always ask other students to dodge tests and bring up excuses for them.

It wasn’t just my armpits sweating - at this point, my legs and palms were all wet. I wasn’t expelled but trust that I will have my revenge before I leave that place!

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