Umuganura excites Rwandans in Uganda

Umuganura tradition helps to borrow positive cultural values from ancient traditions that can be used to build unity and consolidate the achievements of Rwandans.
Amb. Mugambage (R) shares a drink with Frank Macari, one of the Rwandan elders in Uganda during the Umuganura celebrations in Wakyato, Nakaseke District, on Saturday. G. Muramira.

The Rwandan community and friends of Rwanda in Uganda over the weekend celebrated the National Harvest Day (Umuganura), in Uganda, with many describing the event as an epitome of the Rwandan culture.

The celebrations took place over the weekend in Wakyato, Nakaseke district at the countryside home of Faith Bakuru, the treasurer of the Rwandan community in Uganda.

Clad in Rwandan traditional attire, imikenyero and imishanana, Rwandans from different parts of Uganda were served Rwandan traditional staple foods like maize, milk, sorghum and finger millet as they danced to traditional songs.

It was all excitement and joy as many people, both the youth and elders keenly followed every procedure of the event.

“It’s the first time am seeing this. Please do your best to keep holding this event in the villages,” said James Birekeraho, the LC 1 Chairman of Wabusana village in central Uganda.

Joyce Kamukama, the LC 3 Chairperson of Wakyato subcounty, who was amazed by the Rwandan cultural dances, called on the residents not to forget their culture.

In his speech, Rwanda’s High Commissioner to Uganda, Frank Mugambage, said that the Umuganura tradition helps to borrow positive cultural values from ancient traditions that can be used to build unity and consolidate the achievements of Rwandans.

He called on the community to preserve the Rwandan culture, attributing the celebrations to efforts by the RPF leadership that has ensured peace in Rwanda.

“We must all embrace the culture of accountability,” he said.

Scovia Nyiraneza, a youth from the neighbouring Luweero district, called on elders of the Rwandan community in Uganda to help the youth understand their culture.

“We are born and bred in Uganda; we really don’t know our culture. Elders should come to our rescue,” she said.

editorial@newtimes.co.rw

ADVERTISEMENT

 

Consider AlsoFurther Articles