Summit requests Uganda to end support to anti-Rwanda elements

The normalisation of ties between Rwanda and Uganda is largely dependent on the latter’s ability to verify allegations of actions by anti-Rwanda elements based in and operating from Uganda.
L-R: Presidents Yoweri Museveni (Uganda), João Lourenço (Angola), Paul Kagame and Félix Tshisekedi (DR Congo) after the 4th Quadripartite Meeting at Gatuna on Friday. Uganda was asked to end support to anti-Rwanda elements to normalise relations between the two countries./ Photo: Village Urugwiro.

The normalisation of ties between Rwanda and Uganda is largely dependent on the latter’s ability to verify allegations of actions by anti-Rwanda elements based in and operating from Uganda.

This was one of the resolutions following the fourth quadripartite summit between the Heads of State and Government of Angola, Democratic Republic of Congo, Uganda and Rwanda.

 

Presidents Paul Kagame, Yoweri Museveni of Uganda were joined by Angolan President João Lourenço and his Congolese counterpart Félix Tshisekedi.

 

The meeting was held in ‘no man’s land in Gatuna between the two countries and went on for about 3 hours behind closed doors.

 

In place of what was initially expected to be a press conference, the facilitators read out a joint communique which included a resolution that Uganda had been given about a month to verify the allegations presented by Rwanda.

The allegations are largely on actions by anti-Rwanda elements who have been operating from Uganda.

Once proved, Uganda is expected to take all measures possible to address the challenges. The actions and response to the findings will be subject to review by the Ad Hoc Commission on the implementation of the Luanda Memorandum of Understanding.

Once the recommendations are fulfilled satisfactorily, a fifth summit will be convened in 15 days for solemn reopening of the borders and normalization of ties.

Following the meeting, Rwandan dissidents involved in Anti-Rwanda operations in neighbouring Uganda could soon face justice in Rwanda as the two countries signed an extradition treaty between the two countries.

The extradition treaty provides the legal framework to handle cases of justice including those related to alleged subversive activities practiced by their nationals in the territory of the other party

The summit noted that since the third summit held in Angola, there had been progress in some aspects such as the release of prisoners.

“In this regard, the release of prisoners from both sides and the guarantee to continue this process in observance of the rule of law and international humanitarian law were welcomed,” the joint communique read in part.

The Ugandan Government also canceled the passport of Charlotte Mukankusi as the two countries attempt to mend their fragile relations.

Mukankusi is the Commissioner for Diplomacy in Rwanda National Congress (RNC), a terror group that works to destabilise security in Rwanda.

RNC is the organisation behind the spate of grenade attacks in Kigali between 2010 and 2013 that killed several Rwandans and injured many more.

For a long period of time, Mukankusi has held a Ugandan passport, with which she is said to have been conducting RNC’s different activities.

Available information suggests that the passport was issued on March 1, 2019.

Among the aspects Uganda is expected to verify include operations and fundraising activities of RNC leadership through an NGO called Self-Worth Initiative.

Kigali will also be expecting verification of the presence of RUD-Urunana terrorist suspects who were involved in the October 2019 Kinigi attacks.

cmwai@newtimesrwanda.com

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