Qatar attorney general hails Rwanda’s reforms

Al Marri and his delegation were taken through various law reforms the country pursued after the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi as well as the efforts to fight corruption.
The Attorney General of Qatar, Ali Bin Fatais Al Marri (left), and the State minister for Constitutional and Legal Affairs, Evode Uwizeyimana, on Sunday. Al Marri, hailed Rwanda’s recovery and gains in the judicial sector, 25 years after the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi. Emmanuel Kwizera.

Qatar’s General Attorney, Ali Bin Fatais Al Marri, has hailed Rwanda’s recovery and achievements, especially in the judicial sector, 25 years after the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi.

Al Marri was visiting the ministries of Justice and Local Government on Sunday as part of his visit to the country.

At the Ministry of Justice, Al Marri and his delegation were taken through various law reforms the country pursued after the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi as well as the efforts to fight corruption.

Officials said that in line with the 2003 Constitution, a series of judicial reforms aimed at ensuring efficient and effective delivery were implemented.

Among the reforms, Rwandan officials cited the introduction of special courts such as the ones that deal with commercial cases and military matters among other reforms.

The country has also been innovative in case processing by introducing the integrated electronic case management system, officials said.

Qataris delegate takes notes during the meeting on Sunday. Feb. 24, 2019. Emmanuel Kwizera

Speaking about the reforms, the State Minister for Constitutional and Legal Affairs, Evode Uwizeyimana, outlined Rwanda’s strategies in the fight against corruption.

He said that on top of anti-corruption law, the country has also established several institutions that deal with corruption such as the Office of Ombudsman which, apart from fighting injustice and corruption, is tasked with fighting economic and financial crimes.

He highlighted the role of other institutions like Rwanda Investigations Bureau (RIB) and the National public Prosecution Authority (NPPA), which also have units dealing with investigating financial and economic crimes.

The Attorney General of Qatar, Ali Bin Fatais Al Marri, on Sunday, Feb. 24, 2019. He commended Rwanda for its effective mechanisms in fighting against corruption. Emmanuel Kwizera

“Government officials also declare their wealth every year to avoid illicit benefits and this helps in efforts to curb corruption within institutions,” he told the visiting delegation. 

Officials also introduced the visiting delegation to Rwanda’s home grown solutions in the judicial sector such as Gacaca courts that tried nearly two million Genocide cases as well as community mediators, locally known as Abunzi, who contribute to efforts to promote justice.

The Minister for Local Government, Prof. Anastase Shyaka, briefed Al Marri on Rwanda’s Governance journey, imperatives of transformational governance and corruption checks that have enabled then country  to feature among the best reformers in doing business globally.

The Qatar’s Attorney General said Rwanda’s recovery and judicial reforms are so impressive and offer lessons not only to Africa but to the entire world.

He hailed Rwanda’s achievement in unity and reconciliation and helping all Rwandans to live in harmony.

“Rwanda has achieved a lot of things and this should serve as a lesson to everybody,” he added.

“We came to Rwanda to witness the story behind the efforts in fighting corruption.”

editorial@newtimesrwanda.com

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