MINUSCA commends Rwanda police peacekeepers

The Joint Task Force Commander for Bangui (JTFB), Brig. Gen. Mouhamed Selloum, on Tuesday, visited the base camp for Rwanda Formed Police Unit One (RWAFPU-I) serving under the UN Multidimensional Stabilisation Mission in Central African Republic (MINUSCA), and urged them to maintain their professional services.

Brig. Gen. Selloum, who was flanked by his deputy, Col Jean Paul Karangwa, had paid a courtesy call to the Rwandan police peacekeepers operating in the capital Bangui.

“I came to congratulate you for the unwavering commitment and the professionalism you exhibit in your day-to-day peacekeeping tasks,” Selloum said.

He observed that the Rwandan peacekeepers have played an important role in the process to stabilise the capital.

He also thanked them for deploying part of their force to Bangassou (70 police officers) in the fragile eastern part, about 474km from Bangui.

“We applaud the hard work, courage, sacrifice and determination of the Rwandan police peacekeepers. Despite the challenges encountered you have maintained the security of communities and prevented intercommunity clashes. The UN and MINUSCA believe in your capabilities, so continue to preserve that image,” said Brig. Gen. Selloum

Success, he said, doesn’t just happen but rather its the result of effective planning, teamwork, discipline and sacrifice.

RWAFPU-I commander Assistant Commissioner of Police Sam Rumanzi briefed the force on operations they conducted since their deployment in December last year.

RWAFPU-I is in charge of peacekeeping operations in four arrondissements (territorial jurisdictions) in Bangui.

There are over 430 Rwandan police peacekeepers organised in three contingents; two FPUs and a Protection Support Unit (PSU).

The contingents are in charge of public order management, protection of internally displaced persons, key installations and infrastructure.

Others constitute escorts of high-profile government officials, top UN staff, and offer other related services as well as rendering humanitarian assistance, among others.

Others serve as Individual Police Officers (IPO), who work as advisors and mentors.

editorial@newtimes.co.rw

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