Spot light :The myth of “drugs for celebrity status”

When listening to Caribbean native reggae, one can hear the word “Ganja” freely flowing in the lyrics of some of the songs. It appears like these singers are promoting the use of the herb that has so much controversy, especially about its negative effect on addicts.

When listening to Caribbean native reggae, one can hear the word “Ganja” freely flowing in the lyrics of some of the songs. It appears like these singers are promoting the use of the herb that has so much controversy, especially about its negative effect on addicts.

Sure, these artists, most of who are now in their 80’s, were campaigning for the preservation of Ganja because it was closely linked to their culture.

Seeing as Jamaica is defined with some of the origins of this music, most musicians around the world find it inspirational to use, or even misuse the drug.

 The bitter truth is that most of these top ragamuffins and even hip-hop artists smoke or sniff some sort of drug; regarding it as a key to their success. 

Even some of the sexiest females the world has to offer have controversial stories relating to the use of drugs. Britney Spears for instance, was once at the Promises Rehabilitation Clinic in Malibu, which has hosted a number of other celebrities for rehabilitation from drug abuse before.

There is a common presumption that someone ‘high’ cares less about everything and everyone around him (it is basically just them and his world). So some celebs do drugs to gain the kind of confidence that doesn’t care, and this is why they do the wildest things on stage -which to them means a great performance by the way.

Upcoming stars also read stories about how Bob Marley rolled herbs at a press conference; they listen to T-Pain proclaiming his undying love for marijuana. This gives them the impression that a celebrity has to do some drugs also.

But not all people in the entertainment industry believe in the confidence gained from drugs.

 Francois Mihigo, a Rwanda musician based in Belgium is one of them.

 “You cannot compose a good song, conduct yourself well on stage if you are under the  influence of drugs” he said, in an earlier interview with The New Times.

Rafiki Mpazimaka, another artist adds, “Being a celebrity does not mean that you have to take drugs. The cultures of some of those foreign artists maybe do not contradict with drugs. You should pick the best out of their inspiration and leave the unnecessary.”

Rafiki also criticizes fans who don’t believe in musicians’ conduct just because they generally link them to drug addicts.

Athletes like Marion Jones and Argentine world cup winning hero Maradona, are some of the prominent athletes who got their careers while hooked on steroids. Athletes, however, treat it with more secrecy than musicians do, because sports does not permit it. 

Athletes also do drugs mainly to boost their energy, though most of them in the end risk problems like heart failure.

The debate is whether drugs are not to be blamed for social misconduct or whether they are primarily responsible for many losses and shortcomings remains.

The tragic stories of drugs majorly include some people stripping themselves naked because of the insanity that drugs bring, hence engaging in embarrassing ways, like British actor, John Belushi, fashion icon Anna Nicole Smith and singer, Army Wine House, who all ended up dead.

Such stories tell more of the myths surrounding “celebrities doing better because of drugs” and also embracing sayings like “experience is a good teacher”. For those looking for confidence, “everything that yields addiction is worth avoiding.”

emma.munyaneza@newtimes.co.rw

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