Sounds and rhythms of Rwanda

In the 80’s and early 90’s local music started to become vibrant and modernized. In the early 2000’s, Rwandan music changed taste, with the likes of the late Christopher Matata who adopted classic Reggae and Ben Rutabana’s music sounding more like R&B. Youth liked them more, but older people hardly welcomed this modernization.
Masamba performing. (File Photo)
Masamba performing. (File Photo)

In the 80’s and early 90’s local music started to become vibrant and modernized.

In the early 2000’s, Rwandan music changed taste, with the likes of the late Christopher Matata who adopted classic Reggae and Ben Rutabana’s music sounding more like R&B.

Youth liked them more, but older people hardly welcomed this modernization.

Additionally, artists like Mann Martin and Kamichi have introduced a cultural blend in their contemporary songs like

“Umuringa” and “Aho Ruzingyiye” respectively.
Even hip-hop artist, Diplomate, incorporated cultural beats and a chorus in his “Akotsi Kabatabazi” single.

“I made the song sound traditional after receiving advice from old folks who said that modern music promoted western culture,” explains Diplomate. “I will do others, in the same style, because people like Akotsi.”

Teen rapper, NPC’s song, “Nabyisoni” is also traditional because of its rhythm and beats from the cultural flutes and harps.

Jean Claude Tuyisengye, who became famous for his presidential campaign songs, is one of the musicians working hard to promote cultural music.

Intore Masamba and veteran Maria Yohana will also be thanked for their contribution to neutralizing contemporary music.

The cultural sensation in songs makes sounds and rhythm original.

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