Building Self-esteem

“Every achiever I’ve ever met says, ‘My life turned around when I begun to believe in me’—Robert Schuller.Perhaps you have looked at yourself in the mirror and wished that you were Rita, Dan, Sam, Kate or somebody else, maybe a famous actor like William Smith or a sports hero like Christiano Renaldo. If your answer is yes, you are in good company.
Parents can help build their teenagers self-esteem.
Parents can help build their teenagers self-esteem.

“Every achiever I’ve ever met says, ‘My life turned around when I begun to believe in me’—Robert Schuller.

Perhaps you have looked at yourself in the mirror and wished that you were Rita, Dan, Sam, Kate or somebody else, maybe a famous actor like William Smith or a sports hero like Christiano Renaldo. If your answer is yes, you are in good company.

Probably everyone has wished that they could change at least one of their physical features, their nose, complexion, height, weight or hair.  However looking good does not guarantee happiness.

Also, some beautiful and rich people are very insecure because they are always worried about losing their money or possessions and looks.

Teenagers need to develop friendships that will help them focus on inward beauty, on character rather than outer appearances and possessions. Some people think that they are good for nothing, that they are ugly, not good in sports or in their academics but if we rely on beauty, wealth, possessions, friendships and outward aspects of our lives for our self-esteem or worth, then we may just find temporary happiness and fulfillment. 

A statement by Eleanor Roosevelt explains this better. “One only gets to the top rung, on the ladder by steadily climbing one at a time and suddenly all sorts of powers and abilities which you thought never belonged to you become within your own possibility and you think ‘Well I’ll have a go too. 

You must do the very thing you think you cannot do.”

The author is a student at FAWE Girls’ School.

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