The healing process:Healing is straight from the heart

Thanks to the Government of Rwanda for the remarkable achievements in implementing forgiveness, healing, reconciliation and unity, 17 years, after the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi.

Healing is straight from the heart

Thanks to the Government of Rwanda for the remarkable achievements in implementing forgiveness, healing, reconciliation and unity, 17 years, after the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi.

Ibuka, Avega Agahozo and different Government projects have aided healing. However, curing begins at an individual basis. Applying healing is next to impracticable, if the concerned person doesn’t embrace it at heart.

True healing comes as a personal initiative.

Healing takes a brave heart. Crimes committed against the Tutsi in 1994 are beyond human understanding; projects and positive talk cultivate the courage to forgive but healing remains an act of bravery, right from the survivors’ heart.

With all the brutal massacres without sparing the toddlers, healing can never come on a silver plater; survivors carry a heavy cross which they alone can choose to get rid of.

The above explains why survivors much as they forgive still face trauma and horrific memories. However, healing comes with inward forgiveness. The ‘Never Again’ message should be preached but no one can ever force forgiveness. Forgiveness sets free both the perpetrator and survivor but it comes as a personal choice.

I don’t mean to underrate the community’s good works to implement reconciliation and forgiveness. The reality is—a person only receives healing when they want to. For example; a survivor whose life, happiness, hard work, came to a halt in 1994, and until now cannot think beyond the 1994 Rwandan Genocide, or a common case of survivors carrying personal blame for not being able to rescue families in 1994. This can only be left behind if survivors take individual steps to forgive, focus and look ahead.

It is a true tale that a person is often the best solution to their problem. Healing, counseling, personal consolation about surviving the Genocide, are tools to healing, and not many meetings and speeches. Through this, successful survivors have led others to forgiveness and healing.

Life or death is a matter of choice. Survivors often choose health, through forgiveness and healing, no matter how hard it is.

And how come there are a few exceptions of Hutus who rescued Tutsi? Clear evidence that good or bad are personal choices, like healing or resentment.

Being realistic is also personal. ‘Hating will not resurrect my family, we must show that we are different through treating killers with compassion, not revenge, we should work towards development and restoring our lost dignity,’ these are familiar phrases that help survivors to heal, individually.

The fact that some people believe that God walked away in 1994, makes healing and forgiveness complicated for them. However, blaming God should not be the basis for refusing to deal with pain. Outward signs come after inward decisions are made; and these decisions are usually personal.

As healing takes its course, the only way to achieve it is through survivors’ personally embracing it. Sure all this will be get easier, if survivors take personal measures to heal the lingering wounds from the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi.

lillianean@yahoo.com