When wedding meetings turn into ‘begging rituals’

In one of the wedding meetings that took place at Stella VIP bar, the coordinator of the wedding meeting’s opening remarks were, “As you’ll know, this bachelor is getting married next month. I thought it would be a nice idea to contribute towards his wedding so I’ll be running the collection rounds over the next few days. If you’d like to contribute any amount, I’m sure he will be very grateful.”

In one of the wedding meetings that took place at Stella VIP bar, the coordinator of the wedding meeting’s opening remarks were, “As you’ll know, this bachelor is getting married next month.

I thought it would be a nice idea to contribute towards his wedding so I’ll be running the collection rounds over the next few days. If you’d like to contribute any amount, I’m sure he will be very grateful.”

He added, “there was a pledge list to sign as well. He needs your help to raise money, to share ideas and to plan the event.”

Richard Nshuti, a business man at Remera- Gisementi says, “I would like to take this opportunity to speak for myself and many others who have expressed similar sentiments but choose not to say anything about it. Rwandans, this menace called “wedding meetings” has simply got to stop.”

Unlike today, Nshuti says, in the olden days “weddings were big and communal because children were raised communally.”

“In the Rwandan culture it’s well known that by the time a man stands up and proudly tells his family and friends he is ready to take a wife, he should be ready to handle his expenses for the event,” Nshuti says.

Richard Niyibizi, a resident of Kabeza cell in Kanombe sector emphasizes that so many co-habiting couples have the same ridiculous response of “No money” when asked why they haven’t yet tied the knot.

“If family and friends who really care choose to give you a little extra something to help make your special day more memorable then trust me, with or without wedding meetings, they will,” he said.
Vincent Ngarambe aged 56, says it’s okay to hold wedding meetings. 

“The best time for the primary people in someone’s life to stand with you financially is when you’re getting married, every Rwandan should help close friends and relatives,” he emphasizes.

Edith Mutesi, a banker with Duterimbere Co-operative Bank said, “to put your loved ones through the torture that is a barrage of endless sms reminders to attend your meetings and of course, the stupid rituals such as fines that ensue therein are nothing short of cheap and extremely unfair practice.”

ntagu2005@yahoo.com

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