Girls have what it takes

I am Donna A. Akaliza, a mother and teacher of English language and Literature in English at Riviera High School. I have taught for quite a while and have been able to relate with a number of students but taken keen interest in the female students.
Donna A. Akaliza
Donna A. Akaliza

I am Donna A. Akaliza, a mother and teacher of English language and Literature in English at Riviera High School. I have taught for quite a while and have been able to relate with a number of students but taken keen interest in the female students.

Our girls today are the women of tomorrow.  I should say I believe in the notion; ‘Train a girl and a nation is trained’.
I dream that the women of tomorrow will have a sense of excellence and confidence. That a platform will be provided for them to express their feelings and ideas, right from home to school to their potential work places.

This motivation can only come from the parents, teachers and various organizations.

That they have providence at all times. A girl has all it takes to achieve her goals. Today, the school going girl, lacks a lot of personal effects ranging from scholastic materials to sanitary towels and a pack of motivation.

It is of course the role of parents and guardians to provide for her but also, the role of policy makers to create a climate favourable for affordable quality sanitary towels for girls.

The lack of these items makes her life go amiss because their accessibility leads to full blown confidence and respect from the other gender, the male.

The mentality that the girl child is incapable is instilled by adults who rarely provide an avenue for these little girls to showcase their abilities. For instance, very few schools in Rwanda will provide for co-curricular activities like music, dance, drama, sports and many others.

Yet we are all aware that the best time to bend a tree is when it is still young. A few females will do better at these fields at an older age, with limited commitment.

Another case in point is the myth that a lady can or cannot do this or that. This is still instilled by the traditions around us; for example, there’s a general observation that Rwandan ladies cannot move faster than they do.

Is this the culture that is instilled in our young girls? No wonder, punctuality to work will always be a problem. The fellows despise such females but what about a lady who has her career going? Should they abandon their dream career for good?

I have a hope that my daughter will grow up in a country with opportunities to dream and excel in whatever she decides to do. Maybe she’ll be a great athlete, doctor, lawyer or even journalist, whatever her dreams are, I will give her the support she needs.

Donna A. Akaliza is an English language and Literature in English teacher in Rwanda.

Contact: donnaaajambo@gmail.com

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