Should co-habiting remain an issue in our society?

Co-habiting has always been a taboo in the traditional Rwandan culture; however, with changing times and modernity sweeping across like a stubborn wave, more people are less rigid about some of these conjugal restrictions. This is word on the street about co-habiting. “I would encourage men and women to get married legally because children always become victims of what their parents did when it comes to the time of separation or if one of the parents dies and another resorts to getting married to another person.” Jean Paul Mbabazi, Remera
L-R : The Large Tower at Great Zimbabwe ; Some of the ruins
L-R : The Large Tower at Great Zimbabwe ; Some of the ruins

Co-habiting has always been a taboo in the traditional Rwandan culture; however, with changing times and modernity sweeping across like a stubborn wave, more people are less rigid about some of these conjugal restrictions. This is word on the street about co-habiting.

“I would encourage men and women to get married legally because children always become victims of what their parents did when it comes to the time of separation or if one of the parents dies and another resorts to getting married to another person.”

Jean Paul Mbabazi, Remera

“As Christian it’s an abomination to be with someone that you are not legally married to because either way, you both lack some rights like; sharing medical insurance, can’t access a loan sometimes among many other things.”

Robert Kabera, Local musician.

“Sometimes getting married legally looses meaning when conflict arises and where the wives start asking for divorce so that they can take some belongings of the husband.”

Francois Hakizimana, Remera.

“My advice to all ladies is that they should focus on legally getting married because they and the children are the victims of marriage break ups.”

Providance Mukundwa, Mt Kenya University employee.

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