What they say about the French- English transition

“It was very difficult for people at the beginning because many people used to approach us complaining that it was very hard for them to prepare some reports in English. These days they have gotten used to the system and they are now praising it.” Martin Kasirye, Reporter at Flash Fm Radio.
L-R : Martin Kasirye ; Alphonse Bisangwa ; Odeth Uwimana ; Mustafa Ishimwe ; Esther Ishimwe
L-R : Martin Kasirye ; Alphonse Bisangwa ; Odeth Uwimana ; Mustafa Ishimwe ; Esther Ishimwe

“It was very difficult for people at the beginning because many people used to approach us complaining that it was very hard for them to prepare some reports in English. These days they have gotten used to the system and they are now praising it.”

Martin Kasirye, Reporter at Flash Fm Radio.

“According to the location of our country and what we can benefit from other countries that use English as their first language, I think there was no point as to why we couldn’t join them and share success stories.”

Alphonse Bisangwa, Camp Kigali Primary School teacher.

“You can’t imagine teaching a language that you are not fluent in and at the same time, let alone the beneficiaries who don’t have an English background. I think if I am told to choose which language to use, I can select English.”

Odeth Uwimana, Camp Kigali Primary School teacher.

“It was not so easy at the beginning of this program but now we are adjusting to the system because we are now able to pick what the teacher says and also listen to the news and understand.”

Mustafa Ishimwe, EPAK, Primary School.

“English is easier than French because an English speaker is easily understood as compared to someone who speaks French. Even in class, there is a big difference in our performance.”

Esther Ishimwe, ESKAF Primary School.

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