Projected professional demand trends

As we ushered in the New Year, hope and happiness were written on the faces of many as they looked forward to greater prospects in 2011. New years are always trailed by new opportunities and exploits, they say. 2011 comes with new demands. It is also a defining year for students who sat for the “O” and “A” level exams. 

As we ushered in the New Year, hope and happiness were written on the faces of many as they looked forward to greater prospects in 2011. New years are always trailed by new opportunities and exploits, they say.

2011 comes with new demands. It is also a defining year for students who sat for the “O” and “A” level exams.  The outcome of the exams will certainly map their career paths. As the excellent performers in “O” level exams proceed to the top schools in the country, the senior six graduates will have to make more defining career choices.

For those who consider the marketability of professional courses as something to go by, taking time to determine which professions are likely to be in plummeting demand in the job market will be worthwhile.

The US Bureau of Labour Statistics (BLC) indicated that health care, technology and education sectors will be adding the majority new jobs from the year 2008-2018.
A profession in Network and Data communication is one of those that will have a sustained demand. The degree path for this profession would be a Bachelor’s degree in Computer Science, Information Science and Management Information Systems.

Computer Software Engineering is another course that will have a turgid demand. The degree path for the profession is Bachelor’s degree in Software Engineering or Computer Science.

The less prestigious elementary school teaching jobs will be up for grabs. The degree path for the jobs is   a Bachelor’s degree in Education. Education is one of the Millennium Development Goals and is a basic need that will continue to attract both public and private investments.

local universities should brace themselves to integrate the quality programmes that are on high demand in the job market. Getting qualified in a particular profession is one thing and being able to deliver is another. Many graduates end up frustrated because the kind of programmes they study do not adequately prepare them for the puzzles ahead.

Inadequate resources and facilities is the biggest challenge that has continued to dog universities in developing countries. As a result, they produce graduates who slightly fall short of the standards of those coming from the developed world.

However, the solution lies in sound political systems and education policies that support and boost growth and expansion in the education sector.

The author is the Director of Studies at Nu Vision High

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