Dreaming Big with TEMPO Magazine

Women Today’s Doreen Umutesi caught up with two young women, Aba Hagan and  Abena Amoako-Tuffour who on last Friday September 3, 2010 launched the TEMPO magazine—an online literature that is fun and inspiring for the young African woman. Aba Hagan is a 23-yera-old Ghanaian lady who is currently doing an internship with Oxfam GB in Kigali. With her background in Political Science and International Relations with a focus on International Political Economy, she has a lot to offer the young African woman. Below are excerpts from her interview. 
Dalia the Songbird with Kirie
Dalia the Songbird with Kirie

Women Today’s Doreen Umutesi caught up with two young women, Aba Hagan and  Abena Amoako-Tuffour who on last Friday September 3, 2010 launched the TEMPO magazine—an online literature that is fun and inspiring for the young African woman.

Aba Hagan is a 23-yera-old Ghanaian lady who is currently doing an internship with Oxfam GB in Kigali. With her background in Political Science and International Relations with a focus on International Political Economy, she has a lot to offer the young African woman. Below are excerpts from her interview. 

1. What inspired you to start Tempo Magazine?

Starting a magazine isn’t something I’ve always wanted to do but I love reading and challenging myself with new ideas and stories. I find this very fulfilling and wanted to share that with other young people. As I grow in an understanding of who I am so does my interest in Africa and what my role is in her future. All the initiatives I’ve worked on have been inspired by Africa and the potential that she has.

I’m the kind of person who finds joy in seeing people achieve their dreams and what better way to challenge and inspire young people like myself than through a magazine that is fun, youthful and inspiring.

2. What areas does Tempo address?

TEMPO focuses on the importance of celebrating our achievements, not trying to convince ourselves that we aren’t what outsiders say we are but not apologising for our mistakes and weaknesses but applauding those who have had the courage to dream big for the continent and through courage, hard work and creativity are re-defining the future of Africa.

This is done through the “Forward-thinkers” and “Ordinary People, Extraordinary things” sections. We also want the magazine to be a forum for young African women within the continent and the Diaspora to discuss and work through issues that are unique to them—it’s a forum to challenge and encourage one another to be more. This is achieved mainly through “Opinion Unscripted” section where the readers have their space in the magazine to share their views.

3. How will TEMPO help Rwandan women?

The stories told in TEMPO are of daring, bright, compassionate and motivated people and I believe that these are stories everyone can draw encouragement and inspiration from. There are so many opportunities for young people in Rwanda right now and what we want to say to the Rwandan woman is don’t be afraid to dream big and to take steps into making those dreams a reality. It is those audacious steps that will continue to build this nation.

4. What is so catchy about TEMPO?

TEMPO is catchy because it is relevant. It is current and we try to tell stories that may not be highlighted in commercial magazines. It’s done by young people, for young people and takes sisterhood from just having an exhilarating conversation over coffee to a worldwide level!

5. How do you expect to roll out?

Now, our main focuses are making TEMPO all we’ve promised it to be and getting the word about the magazine out there. Although Abena and I will be running TEMPO from different continents we see this as an opportunity to reach more people and build larger networks.

6. Any message to your fans?

It seems a bit premature to say we have fans but to all those who have and who will read TEMPO I hope the lives of those celebrated and highlighted will push you to greatness! If TEMPO inspires you as much as it has inspired me, then all the hard work would have been worth it.
Don’t brush away dreams that you have whether it’s volunteering your time at a local charity, climbing Mt. Kilimanjaro, starting a new venture, completing your studies or just becoming a better person. Like my boss says: “the sky isn’t the limit, it’s just the foundation”.

www.tempoafrica.com

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