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Is openly testifying on what happened during genocide a way of fighting trauma? The theme for the 16th commemoration period “let us join our efforts in fighting trauma,” is of great value since most genocide survivors witnessed a lot of brutality and barbaric incidents that can’t easily be erased from there lives.

Is openly testifying on what happened during genocide a way of fighting trauma?

The theme for the 16th commemoration period “let us join our efforts in fighting trauma,” is of great value since most genocide survivors witnessed a lot of brutality and barbaric incidents that can’t easily be erased from there lives.

The Minister of Sports and Culture, Joseph Habineza said that “Fighting trauma is definitely a process that will take time. It is a prevailing problem that is evident in both survivors and perpetrators of the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi.”

Trauma can be classified regarding the different situations; psychological trauma which is an emotional or psychological injury, usually resulting from an extremely stressful or life-threatening situation, Physical trauma an often serious and body-altering physical injury such as the removal of a limb or Post-cult trauma which is the intense emotional problems that some members of cults and new religious movements experience upon disaffection and disaffiliation and so many others.

I interviewed different people to have their say on the issue;

ODETTA MUKAIRANGA (STUDENT)
Openly saying the horrible things that happened during the genocide is a way forward in this era of fighting trauma because the pain is easily relived when someone says what they went through.

SIMON KABANDA (PARENT)
Trauma is caused by not willing to accept the truth and living with it, so openly testifying helps a person from living in denial.

CAROL UWERA (ADMINISTRATOR)
Besides testifying, showing the survivors care and that we share the same pain will help in curbing down trauma cases especially during the commemoration period.

KAREEM BAGUMA (BUSINESSMAN)
Testifying does not help in trauma cases only but even in getting to know what happened during genocide. Trauma cases are rampant in commemoration time hence lets comfort the survivors since they need affection.

JOHN NGARAMBE (STUDENT)
The survivors need to be counselled; openly saying what happened is really good for their health.


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Dorau20@yahoo.co.uk

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