How do you see Rwanda 16 years down the road?

The month of April is a somber one in Rwanda. Rightfully so this is the month that Rwandans commemorate the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi, keeping the memory of those who perished alive. However, there is much more Rwandans have to say on the country’s progress 16 years after the 1994 bloodshed.
L-R : Shirley Randell ; Ninette Dusabe ; Josiane Uwineza, a.k.a Miss Jojo ; Sylvester Umwanawabo
L-R : Shirley Randell ; Ninette Dusabe ; Josiane Uwineza, a.k.a Miss Jojo ; Sylvester Umwanawabo

The month of April is a somber one in Rwanda. Rightfully so this is the month that Rwandans commemorate the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi, keeping the memory of those who perished alive. However, there is much more Rwandans have to say on the country’s progress 16 years after the 1994 bloodshed.

“In my opinion the progress in Rwanda since the genocide has been spectacular. Rwanda is the world leader in female representation in Parliament.  It is a model for the fight against corruption and HIV/AIDS, as well as economic development, for its neighbours in East Africa and, indeed, the continent.

In relation to gender equality and women’s empowerment, women are making great progress in achieving business loans, generating income and becoming economic leaders in their communities.  Rwanda is also making tremendous efforts in combating gender-based violence (GBV), in regard to the GBV law, police gender desks, and the advocacy of NGOs, civil society and UN agencies, especially UNIFEM and UNFPA.

I feel immensely privileged to be living in this amazing country which I greatly love.”

Shirley Randell, Secretary General of Rwanda Association of University Women (RAUW) and Vice President of International Federation of University Women (IFUW).

“It’s just unspeakable! The way Rwanda has tremendously developed in just 16 years after the 1994 Rwanda Genocide against the Tutsi. I was born in the Democratic Republic of Congo, but I remember when I was a little girl, I used to hear people saying that Rwanda was insecure and that killing was the order of the day.

Thanks to the current regime for over-powering the cruel regime and for securing security in the country and development in all sectors.”

Ninette Dusabe, Rwandan model.

“Rwanda has progressed in all sectors, especially in education. The government introduced the Nine Year Basic Education policy, to encourage Rwandans to study. I’m really impressed by the way Rwanda is moving on.”

Sylvester Umwanawabo, Electrician.

“The fact is that Rwanda is on a hook! Imagine it is just 16 years down the road, but very many countries across visit Rwanda everyday to seek for advice in different things, including security and development. Long Live Rwanda, long live Rwandans!”

Doe Nyandwi, Shop Attendant.

“One thing I appreciate is the fact that the world finally accepted that there was Genocide in Rwanda. I also appreciate Rwanda’s swift development, and security in all parts of the country.”

Josiane Uwineza, a.k.a Miss Jojo, Rwandan artist.

“Honestly, Rwanda is on an amazing level. I used to be on street, but I’m now employed and living a happy life with the little I earn. The current government encourages people to work, and it has created opportunities for people to live a reasonable life.”

 Jill Twaguramungu, Shop Attendant.  

“Rwanda is on a better level compared to 16 years ago. It is secure, and justice is for everyone, not the selected few.”

Jean d’Amour Nduwawe, Manpower Company.

“Personally I’m so impressed by Rwanda’s progress 16 years after the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi. My family and I came to Rwanda shortly after the tragedy, but I can tell you that Rwanda develops every other day. 

The government has also done well to foster unity and reconciliation, especially between the Genocide survivours and perpetrators, as well as establishing peace and security in the country. I really appreciate the country’s progress.

Famida Hashim, Electronics Businesswoman.

Ends

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