BEAUTY PAGEANTS : What the youth say

The culture of beauty contests has reached secondary schools. There is a lot to learn especially when it comes to the cultural part of the contest and the educative part which comprises of questioning and answers.
More youth are getting involved in beauty contests
More youth are getting involved in beauty contests

The culture of beauty contests has reached secondary schools. There is a lot to learn especially when it comes to the cultural part of the contest and the educative part which comprises of questioning and answers.

People who believe that this culture is not good have wrong perception and misinterpret the real meaning of these contests, says Astelie Nagarambe, 17, a S.6 student at Green Hill Academy.

She explains that many people have been exposed to different parts of the world through such programs. “This has also enabled them to help the needy,” she added.

Alex Rukundo, 15, a student at Eto Muhima said that in most cases boys or men are left behind in such contests.
“It’s only today that some people have come to realise that having a Mr. is important to create a balanced society or community,” said Rukundo.

He explained that although other people may not be interested, it is important to note that there are others who believe it is important for men.

In an interview with Miss East Africa 2009, Cynthia Akazuba, said that, she has managed to represent Rwanda on several occasion as well coordinate programs to help the youth and disabled.

“I have managed to conduct and sensitize youth on the dangers of HIV/Aids, preventive measures and even promote government policies like environmental conservation through planting trees and much more,” Akazuba said.      

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